Podcast category: Legal Technology

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: Practicing Law in an Age of Mass Surveillance

What has changed for lawyers in this “post-Snowden” world? Although this topic could be discussed for days, we lightly touch on the main themes in this Special Report with David Lat, Ben Wizner, and host Sharon Nelson. Lat and Wizner summarize their ABA TECHSHOW 2016 presentation titled “Can They Hear Me Now? Practicing Law in an Age of Mass Surveillance.” Ben opens the conversation with a comparison of old methods lawyers once used to secure their files, such as locking files in cabinets, and how the new digital communication landscape poses unforeseen data security challenges for law firms. David then expounds upon this point by expressing how many lawyers aren’t thinking about securing their data and could be facing huge ethical problems. The conversation then focuses on an analysis of whether lawyers should use the cloud and how, in certain instances, it could be more secure for law firms to do so.

Ben Wizner is the director of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy & Technology Project. For nearly 15 years, he has worked at the intersection of civil liberties and national security, litigating numerous cases involving airport security policies, government watch lists, surveillance practices, targeted killing, and torture. He appears regularly in the global media, has testified before Congress, and is an adjunct professor at New York University School of Law. Since July of 2013, he has been the principal legal advisor to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Ben is a graduate of Harvard College and New York University School of Law and was a law clerk to the Hon. Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

David Lat is the founder and managing editor of Above the Law, an online publication that critically analyzes and reports on legal news. Lat graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School and spent the first part of his career as a federal prosecutor in Newark, New York.

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: Collaboration Tools That Save You Time

Let’s face it. Email is inefficient when collaborating with multiple people on documents or projects. There are now independent collaboration tools that streamline processes and reduce the time you spend searching for information. Jonathan Tobin discusses these new tools with Jared Correia during ABA TECHSHOW 2016. One of the hosts of the presentation, “Realtime Collaboration Isn’t Just for Conference Rooms Anymore,” Tobin talks about how lawyers who work together in systems like Google Docs rather than sending emails back and forth can really save time.

Jonathan Tobin graduated from UCLA School of Law. He studied intellectual property, business and international law and served as one of the two editors-in-chief of the UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs. Jonathan received his J.D. from the University of California School of Law.

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: Cloudy with a Chance of Automation

Legal technologists often recommend automation for lawyers, so they can use their valuable time practicing law rather than on data entry. In this Special Report, Jared Correia interviews Heidi Alexander, Joseph Bahgat, John Mayer, Larry Port, Jack Newton, and Andrew LeGrand, and presenters at ABA TECHSHOW 2016. They have a few laughs while giving listeners some quick tips on how to get started, even if they are beginners in automation. From using the cloud to text expansion, you will leave this podcast with a new trick for efficiency and a smile on your face.

Heidi Alexander is a Law Practice Management Advisor at the Massachusetts Law Office Management Assistance Program (MassLOMAP), where she advises lawyers on practice management matters and provides guidance in implementing new law office technologies. Heidi is also the co-host of The Legal Toolkit.

Joseph Bahgat is a practicing attorney focusing on Internet, media, and intellectual property litigation, and is passionate about the ways technology is forcing change upon an industry and culture so resistant to it.

John Mayer is the executive director of the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction. CALI is a 501(c)(3) non-profit consortium of over 200 U.S. law schools and many law firms, legal studies, legal aid programs and law libraries.

Larry Port, Rocket Matter founder and CEO, is a speaker and award winning writer at the crossroads of the legal profession, cutting edge technology, and business processes.

Jack Newton is the founder and CEO of Clio, one of the pioneers of cloud-based practice management. Jack has spearheaded efforts to educate the legal community on the security-, ethics- and privacy-related issues surrounding cloud computing, and has become a nationally recognized writer and speaker on these topics.

Andrew LeGrand is the founding partner at Spera Law Group, LLC and counsels Small Business Owners on the wide array of challenges they face. He is also a speaker and technology consultant for PaperlessChase, a New Orleans based group that help lawyers make their practices more efficient.

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: Using Excel in Your Law Office

Excel is a powerful tool that is often underutilized in law offices, but lawyers shouldn’t be intimidated by it. Hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek interview ABA TECHSHOW 2016 presenters Ivan Hemmans and Allan Mackenzie about how beginners and experts can better use Excel to improve their law practice. The conversation opens with both presenters providing keyboard shortcuts to help make your Excel experience more efficient. They then share tips and insights to help you more smoothly maneuver through the spreadsheet and it’s features. From pivot tables to sorting subtotals these tips will help you better utilize Excel in your law office.

Ivan Hemmans is the manager of technology development and communications at O’Melveny & Myers LLP where he uses his extensive experience with information technology to help people find ways to solve everyday problems with the many available tools at their disposal. Ivan often speaks about legal technology at law firms and conferences. He writes a blog and occasionally for legal technology publications like Peer to Peer Magazine.

Allan Mackenzie is a 25-year veteran of the legal technology world. His experience ranges from that of a former night-shift word processor to a Wall Street IT director with a specialty in litigation technology. He has helped many firms of many sizes figure out what they need in terms of practice management and case management systems.

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: The Mac Power Users

Are you looking for ways to improve your Mac skills to increase efficiency and productivity in your practice? In this Special Report, John W. Simek interviews Macintosh experts Katie Floyd, Jeff Schoenberger, and David Sparks about their presentation at ABA TECHSHOW 2016. The conversation opens with tips to help you better manage your email use, maximize your scheduling efficiency, and curb annoying notifications. From key board shortcuts and reading services to best third party programs and best practices the guests give you the tools to be a Mac power user today.

Katie Floyd is a litigator and co-creator and host of the Mac Power Users Podcast. She’s also a consultant on Apple and other technology related topics. Katie has presented sessions for the National Business Institute, Macworld Expo, and the American Bar Association. She was also a contributor to Macworld Magazine and writes a monthly article for ScreenCastsOnline Monthly Magazine.

Jeffrey R. Schoenberger, Esq. is an attorney and consultant for Affinity Consulting. He specializes in HotDocs document assembly software, desktop office software, and Apple Macintosh and iOS hardware and software. Jeffrey received a B.A. in History from Yale University and J.D. from the University of Virginia.

David Sparks is an Orange County, California, business attorney. He’s also an author, podcaster, and blogger who writes about finding the best tools, hardware, and workflows for using Apple products to get work done. David also writes for Macworld magazine and speaks about technology.

Special Reports

ABA TECHSHOW 2016: Creating Compelling Podcast and Video Content

Have you been listening to podcasts and watching online videos and think you have valuable content to share with your peers or clients? In this Special Report, Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Legal Talk Network CEO Adam Camras and legal technology expert Tom Mighell about creating valuable content, what equipment you might need, and steps you can take today to get started. Tom opens the conversation by explaining what a podcast is and just how easy it is to create your own video or podcast content. Adam then discusses how you can extend your brand and have a distributed network to disseminate information through podcasting. The conversation then concludes with both guests explaining how anyone can become a podcaster today and emphasizing the importance of being authentically you.

Adam Camras is the chief executive officer of Legal Talk Network. He has been involved in the legal industry for over a decade and enjoys learning about the latest technology and trends affecting the industry. Adam travels the country for speaking engagements, to attend conferences, and to meet with members of the legal community.

Tom Mighell has been at the front lines of technology development since joining Cowles & Thompson, P.C. in 1990. Mighell is a published author, noted legal technologist, and runs his own blog, “Inter Alia.” He is currently senior consultant for Contoural, Inc., working with corporations to improve their records management and e-discovery practice, and he has served as chair of the ABA Law Practice Management Section.

Paralegal Voice

What Paralegals Need to Know About Going Paperless

Going paperless seems to be one of the top new trends among law firms due to cheaper and better hardware and software, refined processes, and effective consulting. And it is especially important for paralegals to know the do’s and don’ts of implementing a paperless office as they may be the ones in charge. So why are so many firms going paperless and how is it done effectively?

In this episode of The Paralegal Voice, Vicki Voisin interviews practice management advisor and former paralegal JoAnn Hathaway about why law firms should go paperless, the risks and perils of improper execution, and the important role paralegals play in this process.

Topics include:

  • JoAnn’s journey from paralegal to practice management advisor
  • Can a law firm or business actually go completely paperless?
  • Gaining the competitive edge with efficiency and organization
  • What hardware, software, and processes you need
  • Mobile lawyering and cloud computing options
  • Implementation risks and the ten perils of bad policy
  • Assigning specific tasks to law firm staff members
  • Why and how to get everyone on board
  • The importance of having a paralegal intricately involved
  • Synchronization and compatibility of hardware and software

JoAnn L. Hathaway works for the State Bar of Michigan as a practice management advisor. She previously worked as a litigation paralegal, a legal liability claims director and risk manager, and a legal administrator. JoAnn is an Adobe Acrobat Certified Expert, and holds software certifications in LexisNexis Time Matters and Billing Matters software.  She is active in the ABA Law Practice Management Division, serving on the Publications Board and the State and Local Bar Outreach Committee. JoAnn is a frequent speaker on law firm technology, insurance, and risk and practice management topics.

Special thanks to our sponsors, Boston UniversityNALA, and ServeNow.

Digital Detectives

Edward Snowden’s Legal Advisor Sides with Apple in FBI Battle Over Encryption

During the investigation of the San Bernardino shooting the FBI obtained a company iPhone that was used by Syed Farook, one of the assailants. The investigators obtained a warrant to search the phone, but it’s currently locked and the FBI hasn’t been able to access the encrypted data. This prompted the agency to request assistance from Apple to bypass the phone’s security features, but Apple has refused. Does the FBI have the authority to compel a company to re-engineer its own product in order to undermine the security of its own customers?

In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech Privacy and Technology Project Director and principal legal advisor to Edward Snowden Ben Wizner about the legal battle between Apple and the FBI. Wizner begins by explaining The All Writs Act and how it’s being used to coerce Apple, the FBI’s potential objectives in making this request, and what dangers might be present if the FBI prevails. The conversation then shifts to the global implications for all tech companies if the the precedent is set that Apple must aid in helping the FBI get the contents of this phone and what that might mean for the national security of the United States of America – and the privacy of its citizens. Wizner then gives some insights into what it has been like to be the principal advisor for Edward Snowden and what the case has been like for him as a lawyer.

Ben Wizner is the Director of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy & Technology Project. For nearly fifteen years, he has worked at the intersection of civil liberties and national security, litigating numerous cases involving airport security policies, government watch lists, surveillance practices, targeted killing, and torture. He appears regularly in the global media, has testified before Congress, and is an adjunct professor at New York University School of Law. Since July of 2013, he has been the principal legal advisor to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Ben is a graduate of Harvard College and New York University School of Law and was a law clerk to the Hon. Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Taking Up Slack: What Lawyers Need to Know About the New Collaboration Tool

More and more lawyers and business owners are noticing and implementing the new collaboration tool Slack, described by its founder as “a messaging and search platform that creates a single unified archive accessible through powerful search.” But why is this particular application gaining traction among all other options including Facebook, LinkedIn groups, or even email? Furthermore, why should lawyers pay attention?

Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell noticed Slack gaining momentum in startups, nonprofit organizations, and even small and medium sized law firms, so they tried it. In their 2016 technology resolutions, Dennis and Tom both decided to learn to use Slack, and implement it in their management of this very podcast. So, after a couple of months, what was the result?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis and Tom discuss the rise of Slack, its advantages and disadvantages, and what lawyers need to know about this collaboration tool. Dennis talks about Slack’s different communication mediums including channels, direct messaging, and starring or pinning conversations and whether these mediums can actually replace email. Tom explains that Slack shines by integrating with other applications like your calendar, to-do lists, and Dropbox. But he finds issue with the pricing models and limited control over user restriction. The hosts end the segment by emphasizing that  litigators and those in records management can’t ignore Slack in discovery.

In the second section of this podcast, Dennis and Tom lightly touch on the recent subject of back doors in Apple products, the FBI, and private encryption. How will Apple vs. the FBI affect data security and confidentiality? And why aren’t more lawyers using encryption today? As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

The Digital Edge

The Lawyer’s Duty of Technology Competence

In 2009, the American Bar Association created the Commission on Ethics 20/20 to examine in depth how changes in technology affect the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct. The commission made many recommendations and, most notably, the ABA modified Rule 1.1 regarding lawyer competence. In the new version, Rule 1.1 Comment 8 reads “To maintain the requisite knowledge and skill, a lawyer should keep abreast of changes in the law and its practice, including the benefits and risks associated with relevant technology…” But what does it really mean to be competent in technology as a lawyer?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Jim Calloway interviews lawyer and legal technology blogger/podcaster Bob Ambrogi about the lawyer’s duty of technology competence, how it applies to discovery and confidentiality, and how technology can really benefit lawyers too.

Topics include:

  • Tech duty: regulatory burden versus the reality of practicing law today
  • State bars that have adopted the ABA rule change
  • Implications of the California eDiscovery Ethics Opinion
  • Relevant technology and knowing what you don’t know
  • Getting up to speed on encryption
  • eDiscovery and knowing how to collect, preserve, and search data properly
  • How to effectively contract out competence
  • The duty to supervise
  • Benefits of technology in practice management

Bob Ambrogi is a legal technology writer, blogger, and podcaster. He writes two nationally-recognized blogs, “LawSites,” covering new networking sites and technology for the legal profession, and “MediaLaw,” on freedom of the press. Ambrogi is a Massachusetts attorney representing clients at the intersection of law, media, and technology for his firm, The Law Office of Robert J. Ambrogi.

Special thanks to our sponsors, ServeNowCloudMask, and Scorpion.

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