Podcast category: Legal Technology

Special Reports

How Data Science is Speeding Up Lawsuits: Bennett Borden Interview at LegalTech

Laurence Colletti from the Legal Talk Network interviews e-discovery expert Bennett Borden about how electronic data collection and analysis is increasing the efficiency and accuracy of large scale litigation. This historically unparalleled ability “to get to an answer” is having a significant effect on the legal industry. Not only is it driving companies to faster settlements and empowering small plaintiffs’ firms to take large cases but it is also impacting the billable hour model used by large firms. Borden is a partner and Co-chair of the information governance and e-discovery group at Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

 

Special Reports

The Future of Legal Technology: Rohit Talwar Interview at LegalTech West Coast

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Rohit Talwar, CEO of Fast Future, about the conclusions of ILTA’s Legal Technology Future Horizons Research Project. This project focuses on how advances in technology will impact the legal sector in the near future. As technology has now become an integral part of legal services, customer interface, and internal processes, Talwar explains, a focus on IT will be essential in order to compete in the global market. Within Fast Future, Talwar acts as a futuristic strategic advisor to many companies, governments, and organizations around the world.

 

 

Special Reports

Can Technology Fuel Small Firms: J. Craig Williams Interview At LegalTech West Coast

During the 2014 LegalTech West Coast trade show, Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Lawyer 2 Lawyer host J. Craig Williams who specializes in civil litigation, white collar criminal matters, as well as admiralty and tax issues. Together they discuss how small law firms use technologies to even the playing field with large law firms. Williams explains that technology is pervasive in how lawyers give trial presentations, communicate with clients, market their services, and even manage a practice. Small and medium sized firms can adapt more quickly to new technologies making up for their lack of big-firm resources. Tune in for 3 tools every lawyer should be using and 3 ways to make a practice more nimble.

 

Digital Detectives

Cull, Baby, Cull – Modern Trends in Data Collection and Analysis

Despite all the attention that e-discovery has received over the last decade, it is still a relatively new part of the litigation process. For those lawyers who were never exposed to e-discovery in law school or their formative years, the systems and products involving data collection and analysis can be overwhelming and complex. How much do lawyers need to know about information governance, data collection, data analysis, managed document review, and electronically stored information (ESI)? Alternately, for those data collection practitioners who are already intricately involved in the culling and analysis, how is the technology and process changing?

In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview e-discovery solutions expert Aaron Lawlor about what is involved with ESI and data collection, current trends in data analysis, and future advances in technology and process. Lawlor urges every litigator to become experienced with the state and federal rules involving e-discovery in order to better serve their clients. He explains the process of research and documentation of key players in the case, and then collecting, analyzing, and refining any relevant information before presenting to the counsel. In order to facilitate this process, lawyers and data collectors narrow the data set early by a process of visualizing connections and communication mapping. It is important, Lawlor says, for every lawyer to become familiar with e-discovery and data collection, since it is an increasingly important source of information.

Aaron Lawlor is the senior director of Global Legal Solutions at UnitedLex Corporation. He has spent the past decade addressing his clients’ e-discovery needs, first as an attorney at Am Law 100 firm, then as the cofounder of a boutique consulting and managed document review company. His company was acquired by UnitedLex in 2013 and, in his current role, he partners with in-house and outside council to implement value-driven e-discovery solutions.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Digital WarRoom.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

How A Lawyer Can Control Their To-Do List With Task Managers and Technology

While preparing for a trial, gathering documents for a transaction, or simply running errands, most lawyers face each day with an overwhelming number of things to get done. From simply remembering them all to putting the list into proper priorities, every legal professional could use some help. How can technology play a role in bringing the list of to-dos under control? What are some questions lawyers should ask when choosing a to-do task management tool?

In this episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss taming the to-do list, their own approaches to using technology to help with task management, and questions every lawyer should ask when looking for a management tool to suit their needs. Kennedy shapes his list management around David Allen’s “Getting Things Done,” a system which allows him to see his weekly calendar as a big picture and sort priorities to avoid being overwhelmed by the enormous list of projects. Mighell says lawyers should watch for eight essential functions when looking for the right task manager:

  • Available on Multiple Platforms
  • Ease of Entry
  • Recurring Tasks
  • Multi-List Capable
  • Assign Priority Levels
  • GTD Functionality
  • Notes and Attachments
  • Ability to Share Task Lists

He recommends every lawyer weigh the importance of each of these before choosing a task management tool. Both @DennisKennedy and @TomMighell stress that this is a personal choice and ask the listeners for feedback on the to-do technologies they like best. After the break, Kennedy and Mighell discuss the recent tech news story about Russian cybercriminals accumulating a hoard of more than a billion user passwords. They examine whether lawyers should be worried about this data breach, and what they should do to protect their online accounts. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Special Reports

John Isaza Explains Information Governance and Defensible Disposition at LegalTech West Coast

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews John Isaza, a pioneer in information governance and records management, at the LegalTech West Coast Trade Show. Together they discuss the concepts of defensible disposition as well as risk, readiness, and revenue as they pertain to information governance and law firm data. Although attorneys can’t sell or disseminate client data, they should be prepared to discuss the issue of profitable data with their clients. The foundation for an excellent information governance system includes these recordkeeping principles: accountability, transparency, integrity, protection, compliance with regulatory/privacy/global requirements, availability, retention, and disposition (ATIPCARD).

 

 

New Solo

Client Intake: Best Practices and Procedures

As any solo lawyer knows, taking a new client is not simply shaking a hand and signing a checkbook. After marketing and selling legal services, there are still several necessary steps before beginning work. A conflict check must be done, the client’s data and information need to be gathered, and a retainer engagement letter must be drafted and sent off. Many new solo practitioners think they will be able to remember every matter and deal with situations as they come, but it is much more efficient to have a data management tool and systematic habits in place when dealing with clients.

On this episode of New Solo, Adriana Linares interviews attorney Chad Burton about best practices for client intake and how things differ in a virtual law firm model. He emphasizes that particularly solo and small firm lawyers should remember that a conflict check must be done before payment is accepted. Then a retainer engagement letter is drafted that ought to contain fee structure, disclaimer, shortened terms of service, and preferences like whether the client prefers paper or electronic bills. Additionally, the lawyer should provide an explanation of how costs are handled, what is passed-along, why the client pays for certain things, and whether the firm charges for research so the client never has a question about cost. Burton recommends that the solo or small firm lawyer create a process by working hard to find the right management tool and creating good habits around using it. Even the data in small matters add up.

Chad Burton is the founder of Burton Law, one of the leading firms in virtual law firm structure. Formerly in a big law firm, he now represents technology-oriented companies from startups to multi-national. Additionally, he started Curo Legal, a company that helps legal professionals with serving their clients efficiently and productively.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Solo Practice University.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Turning Legal Services into Products

Lawyers often focus on how they can use technology to improve the efficiency and quality of their legal services. However, technology has additionally started to change what people in other professions provide to their clients, even to the point of changing the meaning of “services.” Professionals are now creating products that provide revenue in the form of royalties, thereby exceeding what can be made in billable hours. These include books written about new forms of technology, tax guides, answers to common questions, convenient apps, and even software. Is this a “Big Idea” that lawyers should also be considering as they think about the ways they might use technology?

In this episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss how lawyers might begin “productizing” services, some ideas about how to create successful products, and the legal and ethical implications of providing this information. Kennedy explains that products such as books or apps providing tips on marketing, finance, general management, or technology are valuable to lawyers. Most often, the lawyer or firm has already done the research required, and simply needs to create a means for selling it. Kennedy recommends several ways lawyers should get started: analyze what other lawyers are doing successfully, look closely at the strengths within your firm, and learn by trying certain products even though they might fail. Mighell points out that the concept of creating products out of your firm is not a simple process, rather it requires a lot of thought and should not be gone into as a whim.

After the break Kennedy and Mighell ask anyone who thinks they might be the right candidate to write a book providing information on technology for lawyers to reach out and let them know. They emphasize that many lawyers underestimate their own level of experience and offer to provide subject ideas. Tweet @DennisKennedy or @TomMighell or click the link below to download a proposal form. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

ESI Report

A Day in the Life of an E-discovery Case Manager

E-discovery is an intricate and complicated process where law and technology intersect to find solutions to complex litigation challenges. Lawyers and legal professionals going through the e-discovery process are often overwhelmed with data and information in varying systems in different stages of technological advancement. From millions of documents to tight production deadlines, no one understands the realities of the e-discovery frenzy better than an e-discovery case manager.

On this episode of The ESI Report, Michele Lange interviews Joe Edlund and Matt Samet, two e-discovery case managers from Kroll Ontrack. Edlund explains that it is the job of a case manager to establish a working relationship with the lawyer, including training on the data software, explaining data sets and performance, helping to make deadlines, and generally decreasing stress. Samet describes some of the benefits to the legal professional of having an e-discovery case manager. They are able to see the client from beginning to end and organize data recovery systems, identify response documents, and be proactive about potential issues. Through an open and communicative relationship with engineers and project level support, case managers are able to make the hectic process of e-discovery easier and more manageable. Stick around to the end for a fun quiz about job descriptions.

Joe Edlund is a Kroll Ontrack case manager who partners with law firms and corporate clients to provide sound advice and best practices in connection with e-discovery management. Matt Samet has experience as a case manager and is also a portfolio manager at Kroll Ontrack, also providing clients with e-discovery solutions.

Special thanks to our sponsor Kroll Ontrack.

 

Paralegal Voice

What Paralegals Need to Know About Information Governance, Social Media, and Data Security

Technology has changed the world of law firms and businesses, affecting the way lawyers are required to retrieve, record, and archive information. Instead of communicating entirely by email or phone, professionals are now also exchanging valuable information by instant message, collaboration systems, or social media. It is important for paralegals to understand the ways in which this data is stored and maintained as it can often result in expensive lawsuits.

On this episode of The Paralegal Voice, Vicki Voisin interviews social business management expert Doug Kaminski about data recovery, ediscovery, regulatory requirements, and archiving information that is exchanged through new forms of communication like social media. He emphasizes the importance for paralegals to become technology savvy, not only to assist in relevant lawsuits, but also to expand their skill set. As communications evolve, Kaminski explains, there will be an increased amount of potential evidence passed through instant messaging and social media. Paralegals should be knowledgeable about the laws concerning data retention in order to inform on custodial interviews and depositions. And most importantly, paralegals and everyone should be aware of the consequences of online communications.

Doug Kaminski, VP of Sales at West & Canada at Actiance, specializes in litigation, electronic discovery sales management, technology security, corporate compliance, corporate governance, information governance, archiving, social media, and enterprise software. He is requested as a speaker nationwide on topics including corporate compliance and governments, social media, security, and electronic discovery.

Special thanks to our sponsors NALA and ServeNow.

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