Podcast category: Legal Technology

Special Reports

Evolve Law: Orgorzaly’s Darwin Talk about Tech Disruptions in Law

In this Special Report, Lawbooth CEO Willy Orgorzaly gives a Darwin Talk, a 5 minute thought-provoking presentations meant to intrigue, excite and generate discussion, on how lawyers are adapting to changes in the legal profession at the Evolve Law Client Driven Technology Solutions event held at the Legal Talk Network’s Denver studio. Willy talks about how the legal marketplace is currently experiencing a technological revolution and, similar to the industrial revolution, industries that have existed for decades are being replaced (except this time with apps, websites, and technology). He explains the trends of disruption that these new technologies are causing in various industries and how most companies view them as novelties until they begin to take valuable market share. Willy accentuates this fact by analyzing how Kodak’s development of the digital camera, and lack of investment in this new technology, resulted in their subsequent bankruptcy. He then compares the emergence of legal tech and the legal industry’s response to this new sector of the marketplace to this trend of technologically induced upheaval. Willy also analyzes how millennial consumers and attorneys expect cutting edge technology within the profession; Resistance to this demand results in one third of lawyers and new associates leaving their law firms within three years. He explains that there is a frustration among millennials when they encounter a law firm that does not embrace technology and many of those potential employees are willing to take lower paying jobs that will fulfill their tech expectations. These changes, Willy says, are also increasing access to justice for the common individual by increasing efficiency and reducing cost for law firms (this is a huge fiscal opportunity for the firms that embrace new tech). He then closes the talk by looking toward the future and speculating how these changes will influence client and attorney relationships.

Willy Ogorzaly is the CEO and co-founder of Lawbooth. He attended the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business.

Special Reports

Evolve Law: Client Driven Technology Solutions

There are many thoughts and opinions on what the future of legal tech should be and who should construct that future. If you’re a lawyer interested in influencing growth what are the best ways for you to partner with technologists to do so? How can developers and attorneys work together to help steer the evolution of this industry?

In this Special Report, Evolve Law Co-Founder Mary Juetten, moderator Joe Burchard, and Evolve Law Client Driven Technology Solutions panelists Kate White, John Rome, and Kathryn DeBord discuss the future of legal tech and how attorneys and technologists can best shape it. Mary opens the panel with a brief explanation of what Evolve Law is, a community focused on accelerating the adoption of technology within the legal profession, and her hopes that the discussion will help inspire the creation of a legal innovation group in Colorado. Joe provides an introduction for each panelist and starts a group analysis on the biggest pain points for practicing lawyers. Kate elaborates on what client driven tech solutions actually means, technology solutions tailored to relieve a specific client frustration. She considers new pressures on in-house counsel, the volume areas of work that need to be handled more efficiently, and how outside counsel can partner with legal professionals. Kathryn DeBord answers the question,”Do law firms need technology to grow?” and provides insight on how leveraging current technology can help to reduce monotonous tasks and free up attorneys to more consistently focus on the practice of law. The group then debates whether legal professionals should develop or aid in developing new technologies or whether that responsibility should be left solely in the hands of technologists outside of the industry. John shifts the conversation to data security and the lack of urgency in the legal tech community despite the recent Panama Papers leaks. The group then wraps up the panel with an analysis of artificial intelligence, why robots will never replace lawyers, and a question and answer session with the event attendees.

Adam Camras is the chief executive officer of Legal Talk Network. He has been involved in the legal industry for over a decade and enjoys learning about the latest technology and trends affecting the industry. Adam travels the country for speaking engagements, to attend conferences, and to meet with members of the legal community.

Mary Juetten is the founder and CEO of Traklight and the co-founder of Evolve Law. She is a contributor to the American Bar Association Law Technology Today and Forbes. Mary received her bachelor of commerce from McGill University and her juris doctorate from Arizona State University College of Law.

John Rome is the Chief Software Architect and CEO of Intensity Analytics Corporation. He is a technology inventor and software developer. John received his bachelor’s degree in economics and mathematics from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and his juris doctorate from the University of Minnesota Law School.

Kathryn DeBord is partner and chief innovation officer at Bryan Cave. She is affiliated with the American Bar Association, the Colorado Bar Association, the Colorado Women’s Bar Association and the Washington D.C. Bar Association. Kathryn received her bachelor of arts from the University of Kansas and her juris doctorate from the George Washington University Law School.

Kate White is the Client Engagement & Innovation Strategist at Davis Wright Tremaine LLP. She received her bachelor of arts from Seattle University and her juris doctorate from Seattle University School of Law.

Joe Burchard is a co-founder and the project manager at Lawbooth.com and the founder of Nice Piece of Bass. He received his bachelor of applied science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

New Solo

Top Tips for Attorneys from the 2017 ABA TECHSHOW Board

As attorneys graduate and head into the legal marketplace, or leave a law firm to start a solo practice, it can be hard to know where to find resources with tips on starting your new career. What are the most important things that a newly solo practitioner should know? What are some best practices for lawyers just starting out in the field?

In this episode of The New Solo, host Adriana Linares talks with the ABA TECHSHOW 2017 Planning Board and Law Practice Division member Dan Lear from Avvo to provide need to know advice for newly solo attorneys. This year’s TECHSHOW board consists of Barbara Leach Law PL. Managing Attorney Barbara Leach, O’Melveny & Myers Senior Manager of Technology and Development Ivan Hemmans, and Downey Law Group LLC. Founder Michael Downey. Michael emphasizes that small firms and solo attorneys should focus heavily on their cash flow. Dan states that legal professionals can view their businesses through three different mediums, the balance sheet, income statements, or cash flow. The amount of money coming in each month (and how you pay your expenses) is very relevant to the survival of a new business. Barbara encourages solo lawyers to establish their brand immediately and really determine what type of lawyer they’d like to be and what type of clients they’d like to attract. Michael accentuates the amount of credibility strong branding provides to a new attorney and gives insights into the steps he took to create his own brand. Ivan discusses the necessity of thoroughly learning Microsoft Word and the benefits of document organization. The group then closes the interview with an analysis of basic tech competencies, like email management, that all attorneys should master.

Ivan Hemmans is the Manager of Technology Development and Communications at O’Melveny & Myers LLP where he uses his extensive experience with information technology to help people find ways to solve everyday problems with the many available tools at their disposal. Ivan often speaks about legal technology at law firms and conferences. He writes a blog and occasionally for legal technology publications like Peer to Peer Magazine.

Barbara Leach is the managing attorney of Barbara Leach Law, PL. She is a member of the American Bar Association, The Florida Bar Association, the Central Florida Bankruptcy Law Association, the Orange County Bar Association, and the Central Florida Association for Women Lawyers. Barbara received her BA from the Hamilton Holt School at Rollins College and obtained her juris doctorate from the Florida State University College of Law.

Michael Downey is a legal ethics lawyer and a founding member of the Downey Law Group LLC. He has tried civil and lawyer discipline cases and argued appeals before the Missouri Supreme Court, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit, and Illinois ARDC Review Board. Michael received his B.A. from Georgetown University and his juris doctorate from Washington University in St. Louis School of Law.

Dan Lear is a technology lawyer and the Avvo Director of Industry Relations. He is the co-founder of the Seattle Legal Technology and Innovation MeetUp and founder of the Right Brain Law blog. Dan received his BA in international studies from Brigham Young University and his juris doctorate and MBA from Seattle University.

Digital Detectives

The Panama Papers: The World’s Largest Data Breach

2.6 terabytes of information spanning over forty years of a Panamanian law firm’s life was leaked to a German newspaper and subsequently, the world. What questions does this raise about a law firm’s responsibility for the loss of client/customer data? What lessons can we learn about security as a result of this firm’s data being compromised?

In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek chat with Nuix Chief Technology Officer Stephen Stewart about the Panama Papers, the world’s largest breach of information. Stephen explains that a law firm in Panama named Mossack Fonseca had 2.6 terabytes of information taken from them by an anonymous party, who then gave that information to the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ). The leaked data contained 11.5 million items that consisted of roughly 5 million emails, 3 million databases, 2 million PDF files, and 1 million images. In an attempt to understand and further investigate the received data, SZ then contacted the International Consortium of Investigative Reporters (ICIJ). Stephen talks about what the ICIJ is (basically an international network that includes 165 investigative journalists over 65 countries) and how Nuix’s software was utilized to aid in the data analysis. The group discusses the authorities’ later raid on the law firm’s office and what evidence the digital forensics experts and financial analysts might be looking for. Stephen closes the interview with an summary of the practices that this breach sheds light on, like who the beneficiaries of offshore funds really are and what significant revelations might come from this particular breach.

Stephen Stewart joined Nuix in 2008 and is responsible for leading the evolution of Nuix’s software. He is currently driving the development of Nuix’s information governance and big data solutions. Stephen has more than 15 years experience working with both public and private sector organizations, designing and providing solutions for their email, file, document management and archiving systems.

The Digital Edge

What Lawyers Should Know About Cloud Computing Security Standards

The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.

Jack Newton is the founder and CEO of Clio and recently joined the board of the International Legal Technology Standards Organization (ILTSO). He also co-founded and is acting president of the Legal Cloud Computing Association (LCCA). Jack received his master of science in computing science from the University of Alberta.

Larry Port is the founder and CEO of Rocket Matter and is a speaker and award winning writer at the crossroads of the legal profession, cutting edge technology, and law firm marketing. He was named to the 2012 Fastcase 50 and received his master of computer science with an emphasis in distributed systems from New York University.

Special thanks to our sponsors, ServeNowCloudMask, and Scorpion.

ABA Journal: Legal Rebels

Rocket Lawyer’s Charley Moore sees lawyer collaboration as the future

“Working with tech startups, I realized that there is this vast unmet need for affordable legal services,” lawyer Charley Moore says. “There’s a real need for technology to make it more efficient for lawyers to be able to answer simple questions online and to be able to represent small businesses, individuals, startups and families at fraction of traditional cost.”

Moore decided to try to fill that need with Rocket Lawyer, his online, do-it-yourself legal services provider that helps individuals and small businesses access legal forms (and, if necessary, local attorneys.)

Moore was more bullish about Rocket Lawyer’s recent move to provide employees at large companies with comprehensive legal plans similar to health insurance.

“Our Q&A service is growing very fast,” Moore says. “You can ask a question about any legal situation on any mobile device, and an attorney will respond to that question at an affordable price.”

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Virtual Reality Technology in the Courtroom

Virtual reality is one of the most intriguing and highly anticipated technological advancements on the horizon. With companies like Facebook spending billions of dollars to invest in such tech, could there be applications for VR within the legal profession? How could immersion in virtual worlds improve the practice of law?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss virtual reality, the current tech on the market, and how this tech could be used in the courtroom. Tom and Dennis first provide a definition of what virtual reality is (mainly using technology to create a simulated three dimensional world that you can interact with) and explain how this technology differs from augmented reality. They both then take a look at early forms of the technology, such as Epcot Theme Park’s centrifugal motion simulator Mission: Space, and compare those experiences with current tech options like The Oculis Rift and the HTC Vive. Tom and Dennis end the first half of the show with an analysis of the best use of virtual reality for lawyers, courtroom applications, and common concerns about this technology.

In the second half of the podcast, Dennis and Tom talk about their tips to follow when using public wifi. Dennis reveals his dislike for airplane wifi and gives his suggestions, such as tethering your phone to create a wifi hotspot and using a virtual private network, to make using these services more enjoyable. Tom also gives his advice on things you should never do, like personal banking, when using public wifi. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

The Florida Bar Podcast

Digital Evidence and E-Discovery

Forty nine cents of each dollar spent on electronic discovery is wasted as a result of lawyers not understanding how to properly scope a preservation effort or use forms of production and collection that are both defensible and reasonable. How do lawyers stay abreast with new technology that might become a possible source of evidence and where do they get that information? Why do solo lawyers and small firms need to know about electronic discovery?

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast host, Adriana Linares chats with Computer Forensic Examiner Craig Ball about electronic evidence, e-discovery, and how important it is for litigators to understand this data acquisition process. Craig explains why small firms and solo lawyers should be interested in e-discovery, if they want access to electronic evidence, and why printing physical copies of documents for storage is no longer practical. He also talks about the denial that many lawyers have regarding their need to understand and use new tech and provides resources online where lawyers can go to become more informed about e-discovery. Craig discusses why law firms should insist upon certain electronic competencies from their lawyers, like understanding the appropriate means by which to do reasonable searches of electronically stored information, and why he thinks the bar associations have not done enough to stress the importance of such knowledge. He then closes the interview with an analysis of emerging tools designed specifically to assist small firms and solo practitioners with e-discovery and provides specific software options that can help lawyers with the collection and preservation of evidence.

Craig Ball is a trial lawyer and computer forensic examiner who focuses his practice on serving as court-appointed special master and consultant in computer forensics and electronic discovery. He is a founder of the Georgetown University Law Center E-Discovery Training Academy and serves on the academy’s faculty. Craig received his J.D. from, and teaches Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence at, the University of Texas School of Law.

The Florida Bar Podcast

Data Security and Florida Breach Notification Law

With the legal industry’s increased efforts to integrate new technology into the profession, it has never been more important for law firms to protect themselves and their data. However, what happens when a breach does occur and privileged information is compromised? More specifically, what is a breach notification and what procedures are Florida law firms required to follow immediately after the incident?

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, host Adriana Linares sits down with Orange County Bar Association Technology Committee Chair Daniel Whitehouse to discuss data breach notification procedures and what constitutes personally identifiable information. Daniel breaks down what Florida statutes consider a data breach (basically an unauthorized party accessing restricted data) and gives a few examples of situations within a law firm where this definition applies. He then provides an in-depth explanation as to what types of data fall under personally identifiable information, such as social security numbers, medical records, and email addresses, and discusses what Florida’s data breach notification law is. Daniel takes time to explain what the Florida attorney general’s office will require from law firms that experience such a breach and analyzes what ethical obligations legal professionals have to their clients and the prevention of future unauthorized access. He closes the interview with tips on how law firms can encrypt their data and proactive changes companies can implement to increase their security policies.

Daniel Whitehouse holds a Bachelor of Science in computer science and a Master of Business Administration (MBA), both from Webster University. He interned for The Honorable Susan C. Bucklew of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida and attended Stetson University College of Law where he graduated Co-Valedictorian. Daniel is currently the chair of the Orange County Bar Association Technology Committee.

The Digital Edge

How Technology Has, and Will, Impact the Practice of Law

Over the past 100 years technology has made enormous leaps toward improving the ease of everyday living for the average citizen. This progress has also been reflected in the legal profession as tech becomes more integrated into the working lives of lawyers. However, in what ways has technology improved the profession and how can technological advancements aid us in the future?

In this special centennial episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway sit down with ABA President-Elect Linda Klein to reflect on how technology has improved the practice of law throughout their careers. The hosts open by taking some time to reflect on the last 100 episodes of the podcast and Linda shares her memory of having the Digital Edge be the very first podcast she ever listened to. She then muses over being introduced to technology early in her career and how tech started to influence and improve the way she practiced law. Within these reflections, Linda provides some insight into why she thinks it is important for lawyers to give back to their communities and tips on how tech can help fit everything into one’s busy life. The group then focuses on ABA initiatives centered around positively influencing the rapid change happening in the legal profession spurred by globalization and technology. Linda then looks toward the future and discusses goals that she has for her presidency relating specifically to technology and the practice of law.

Linda A. Klein is president-elect of the American Bar Association.  She is also a senior managing shareholder at Baker Donelson, recently completing a 6 year term on the Firm’s Board of Directors. Her practice includes most types of business dispute resolution, including contract law, employment law and professional liability.

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