Podcast category: Legal Technology

Lunch Hour Legal Marketing

Summer of Lunch Part 4: Legal Blogging Tips from Kevin O’Keefe

Lawyers use blogs to improve legitimacy, show expertise in niche areas, bring in clients, and network with other lawyers. But many who wish to start blogging suffer from perfectionism, have problems with motivation, and are worried about lack of content or subject matter. So where do success-driven lawyers with writer’s block start?

In the 2015 Summer of Lunch series finale from Lunch Hour Legal Marketing, Jared Correia interviews Kevin O’Keefe, CEO of Lexblog, about how would-be legal bloggers should get started, the necessary level of professionalism, using blogs to network and build relationships, and setting beneficial goals. O’Keefe encourages lawyers to see blogging as a conversation with law experts and clients, and avoid the idea of content marketing. He gives advice on motivation, building a following, choosing a niche area, and writing content that is valuable to people.

Kevin O’Keefe is CEO of Lexblog, a blogging platform and network for lawyers and law firms. Lexblog’s LXBN network features the work of affiliated legal bloggers. Previously, Kevin was a trial lawyer for almost 20 years and he started Prairie Law, one of the first widely used internet communities for attorneys.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Wild About Wearables: Fitbits, Apple Watches, and Your Legal Practice

From Fitbits and Apple Watches to robotic exoskeletons, we have entered the age of wearable technology. While this development has definite implications for a lawyer’s ethical duty of technology competence, it will also change how lawyers use technology in their practices. Having a health app can improve standard of living, but does your Apple Watch actually assist in practicing law?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the increase in development of wearable technologies, the benefits for early adopters, and how the nature of legal practice will change. Tom mentions cases in which Fitbit data was used as evidence and notes that ignoring wearable device data could negatively impact your practice. He also dives into a history of wearable technology dating back to a wrist calculator in the 1970s and the creation of bluetooth in 2000. Dennis discusses the health apps and dictation uses on his own Apple Watch and how it benefits his personal life, but maybe not his law practice. Looking into the future, he speculates about necklaces, the return of Google Glass, and even tattoo or piercing technologies to come. While Dennis and Tom differ on how wearable technologies can benefit lawyers, both agree that the age of wearable technology is here, bringing with it ethical considerations and practical uses.

In the second part of the podcast, Dennis and Tom revisit their 2015 resolutions, made in January. They discuss automation, organizing technology, blogging more, Tom’s Microsoft Pro 3, Dennis’ Apple Watch, and their progress in these goals. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Special Reports

Special Report from VANTAGE 2015: Worldwide User Conference

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Elisabet Hardy and Eric Suden from Thomson Reuters Elite at the Vantage Worldwide User Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. They discuss the Elite portfolio including 3E, Business Development Premier, Enterprise, ProLaw, and MatterSphere Matter Management, how these softwares have developed to become more standardized and integrated, and what’s coming in the future.

Elisabet Hardy is vice president of product management and marketing at Thomson Reuters. She has extensive experience in product management, product marketing, and marketing for medium to larger software organizations.

Eric Sugden is chief technology officer for Thomson Reuters Elite. He has a strong background in enterprise architecture, user experience, software engineering, team building, and project management.

Digital Detectives

Hillary Clinton’s Emails and the Looming Issue of Shadow IT

“It is very difficult to conceive of a scenario — short of nuclear winter — where an agency would be justified in allowing its cabinet-level head officer to solely use a private email communications channel for the conduct of government business.”
– Jason R. Baron to the New York Times

On March 2nd, 2015, The New York Times published a breaking story about Hillary Clinton, who used a private email account to conduct government business. Due to The Freedom of Information Act, many people questioned whether Clinton acted inconsistently with her federally mandated record keeping obligations. Furthermore, is this a wakeup call for companies and governmental entities who are not controlling shadow IT, the practice of employees using private devices and softwares at work?

In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jason R. Baron, of counsel to Drinker Biddle & Reath, LLP and co-chair of The Information Governance Initiative, about the Hillary Clinton controversy and the future of Shadow IT, BYOD, and information governance.

Topics Include:

  • Federal records collection and keeping policies
  • Unmarked classified information on Clinton’s private server
  • Federal, state, and other public figures using personal email for public purposes
  • Shadow IT and BYOD policies for companies and governmental entities
  • The bigger picture of big data and information governance
  • Whether Clinton’s actions were legal

Jason R. Baron is of counsel to Drinker Biddle & Reath, LLP, practicing in their Information Governance and eDiscovery Group, and is co-chair of The Information Governance Initiative, a think tank and vendor neutral consortium. Previously, he served as director of litigation at the National Archives and Records Administration, and as a trial attorney and senior counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice.

Special Reports

Changes to the Massachusetts Rules of Professional Conduct in 2015

The Massachusetts Rules for Professional Conduct were officially and extensively revised for the first time since 1998 on July 1st, 2015. Many of these changes were heavily influenced by the 2013 revision to the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct, due to a value recognized by lawyers and courts in having nationwide uniformity. Massachusetts lawyers, pay attention for the changes, what they mean, and practical applications to take in order to stay in compliance with the revised rules.

Jared Correia and Heidi Alexander, advisors at Mass. LOMAP and hosts of The Legal Toolkit, interview Connie Vecchione and James Bolan, experts on legal ethics in Massachusetts, about specific rules Massachusetts lawyers should review to ensure they don’t face malpractice and disciplinary issues. Tune in for specific advice that is easy to implement with regard to technological competence, online advertising, trust accounting, and more.

Constance Vecchione is chief bar counsel for the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers, an agency responsible for investigating, evaluating, and prosecuting complaints of ethical violations brought against Massachusetts attorneys.

James Bolan is a partner at Brecher Wyner Simons Fox & Bolan LLP, where he represents lawyers and law firms in Massachusetts Board Bar Overseers in malpractice matters, as well as providing counsel related to professional responsibility, practice and ethics, malpractice defense, and prevention and risk management. He was previously an assistant bar counsel at the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers.

The Digital Edge

How to Attract Clients in the Digital Era

Legal marketing has changed dramatically in the past 20 years as we have reached “the digital era.” Some lawyers have embraced this new world of social media marketing, engaging website content, and cloud-based computing. But those who have not, particularly solo and small firm lawyers, are missing out on an opportunity for increased client base, client satisfaction, and competition with big law firms.

On this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Sona Pancholy, a business development director, about the ways in which the digital age impacts law firm marketing, what mistakes lawyers should avoid making, where busy professionals should start, and some dos and don’ts of social media.

Topics include:

  • Technology leveling the playing field for law firms
  • Reduced barrier of entry into new markets
  • Increased efficiency in engaging potential clients, preparing pitch materials, etc.
  • Website content to help business development
  • Updating blogs and videos
  • Optimized website for mobile
  • Removing the legalese (yes, we know it’s hard)
  • Data mining and analytics to target your market
  • Bios, LinkedIn, and being familiar with social platforms
  • Technology as a tool, not a solution

Sona Pancholy is the director of business development at Stinson Leonard Street LLC. Based in Washington, D.C., Sona serves on the Education Board of the American Bar Association’s Law Practice Division and has spoken at previous ABA and Legal Marketing Association annual meetings. She has experience training lawyers, judges, lawmakers, and business professionals around the world. In her current role, Sona focuses on creating and supporting best practices and processes for the delivery of top quality business development support across the firm.

Special thanks to our sponsors, ServeNow and CloudMask.

Digital Detectives

Why are Law Firms Beginning to Form Data Breach Practice Groups?

“33% of Fortune 100 Organizations will experience an information crisis by 2017.” – Gartner, an information technology research and advisory firm

Recently, data breaches have become one of the most serious threats to companies worldwide, and as more corporate infrastructure moves online, studies suggest that the rising number of data breaches will cost 2.1 trillion dollars globally by 2019. Because of this, a new market of data breach practice groups has emerged to assist with e-discovery, information governance, data security, and preparation for high-risk technological emergencies. In light of this, what should your law firm or company do to prepare for one of these potentially imminent situations?

In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Martin Tully, co-chair of Akerman LLP’s Data Law Practice, about why his firm decided to implement a data breach law group, how data security fits in with current e-discovery and information governance practices, and what every company should include in an incident response plan.

Topics Include:

  • “Data Law”: e-discovery, information governance, and data security consulting
  • Increased client demand for legal technology services
  • Strategic partnerships between legal and technical professionals
  • Company interests: preparation for data loss, litigation, and government inquiry
  • How to proceed during “the upchuck hour”
  • Reasons for the increase in data breaches
  • Who and what should be involved in the incident response plan
  • Simulated data breach exercises
  • A lack of data security in many law firms

Martin T. Tully is a partner with the Chicago office of Akerman LLP. He is veteran trial lawyer with more than two decades of experience representing domestic and multinational companies in a variety of complex commercial litigation matters. As the co-chair of Akerman’s Data Law Practice, Martin also focuses on keeping clients ahead of the curve regarding the developing law, technology and best practices related to e-discovery, information governance and data security.

In-House Legal

GC at Tumblr: Legal Issues Faced by the Digital Publishing Platform

In 2007, David Karp and Marco Arment started Tumblr, a microblogging website that now hosts over 248 million blogs. General Counsel of Tumblr Ari Shahdadi started at MIT with a graduate degree in computer science. Taking a few risks in his career, Shahdadi moved into the legal field, acquired a law degree from Harvard, and was working in corporate transactional law when he became general counsel at Tumblr.

In this episode of In-House Legal, Randy Milch interviews Shahdadi about his path to general counsel at Tumblr and the legal and nonlegal issues he regularly encounters at the digital publishing giant. Shahdadi discusses how social media controls the public arena, copyright and trademark regulations for user-generated content sites, and the ways in which Tumblr works to balance freedom of speech, government restrictions, and user safety. Shahdadi also talks about how he navigated the internal aspects of selling Tumblr to Yahoo and changes in his position due to the acquisition. Tune in to hear from a general counsel who wears many hats within his company.

Ari Shahdadi has been the General Counsel of Tumblr, Inc. since May 2011, where he leads Tumblr’s Legal, Policy, and Trust & Safety teams. He graduated from Harvard Law School, cum laude, while working for Fish & Richardson, and from MIT with Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Computer Science and Engineering.

Legal Toolkit

The Future of Law Firm Communication: Is Email on the Way Out?

While convenient, email seems to be increasingly a distraction in law firms and most other businesses. Furthermore, email chains about important cases sit in our inboxes next to spam, family interactions, personal information, and more spam. Due to the sheer volume of emails received, lawyers and firm staff often waste time navigating them to find case information. Despite all this, is email really on the way out? If so, what will replace it?

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Jared Correia interviews Ryan Anderson, trial attorney and founder and CEO of Filevine, a project management and collaboration tool for lawyers, about email inefficiency and the future of communication in law offices. Together they discuss how the lack of restriction to email access has become a problem for lawyers, businesses, and individuals. If you are working from your inbox, anyone with your email address can disrupt your workflow. Ryan suggests email as a virtual “front office,” collaboration tools for projects and cases, instant messaging for urgent matters, and overall effective communication processes for law firm efficiency. In the future, he says, lawyers will form teams outside of a firm structure, and many more will work remote. Tune in and let us know whether you believe in the death of email.

Ryan Anderson is the founder and CEO of Filevine, a project management and collaboration tool for lawyers and consumer professionals. Ryan is also a founding partner and trial attorney at Bighorn Law. In five years, Bighorn has grown from two attorneys in Nevada to seventy employees across four states.

Lunch Hour Legal Marketing

The Summer of Lunch Part 3: What Exactly Is The Purpose of Social Media?

Lawyers who listen to podcasts or read marketing blogs will have heard many times over that they should be using social media to market their practices. But who has time to maintain Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram, and multiple other social media accounts? Furthermore, what really is the purpose of an online social presence for a law practice? Can lawyers really attract clients through social media?

In this episode of Lunch Hour Legal Marketing, Jared Correia interviews Leigh McMillan, vice president of marketing at Avvo, during Mass LOMAP’s 5th Annual Marketing Conference in Boston. Leigh explains the importance of participating in social media, how a lawyer’s presence can affect search results, and how to choose the right channel to increase your law firm’s visibility online.

Topics include:

  • How lawyers can attract clients on social media
  • Showcasing knowledge on Facebook
  • Google search results tied to Google+
  • Creating snackable content for YouTube
  • Accurate naming for searchable information
  • Opportunities for lawyers on Tumblr
  • The importance of having a mobile website
  • Developing your social profile and owning your real estate

Leigh McMillan is vice president of marketing at Avvo, an online legal services marketplace featuring lawyer profiles and ratings. Before joining Avvo, Leigh worked for Marchex’s Call Analytics business.

Tweet about this series using the hashtag #summeroflunch!

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