Featured Guests
Juliet Sorensen

Juliet Sorensen is the Harry R. Horrow Professor in International Law with the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law’s Center...

Your Host
Daniel Rodriguez

Daniel B. Rodriguez was appointed Dean and Harold Washington Professor at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law in January 2012. Before...

In this episode of Planet Lex, host Daniel Rodriguez speaks with Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Harry R. Horrow Professor in International Law Juliet Sorensen about the pervasiveness and regulation of corruption. Juliet defines public corruption as the abuse of public office for private gain and discusses the challenges of working within the various parameters of both civil causes of action and criminal law to regulate said corruption. Certain forms of malfeasance, like bribery, have been traditionally governed by criminal law while other forms like patronage and nepotism have been grounds for civil actions under the First Amendment but have generally been found not to be either federal, state, or local crimes. Juliet highlights that in a functioning democracy the safeguard against public officials who the electorate disapproves of is voting them out of office. However, if corruption has pervaded a democracy to the extent that voting public officials out of office cannot be done in a free and fair way, then that is an impingement of human rights. She shares that many countries are unable or unwilling to regulate public corruption for a myriad of reasons, including limited resources and weak institutions, and that in some countries the culture of corruption is so pervasive that it becomes incredibly difficult to change. Juliet also analyzes the International Olympic Committee’s decision not to ban Russia from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and discusses how the McLaren Investigation Report on doping in Russia illustrates abuses of all levels of public office but not necessarily for monetary gain. She closes the interview with an investigation of how the emergency reconstruction phase after major extreme weather events can facilitate corruption and how we can combat this. Finally, she considers the severity of public corruption, domestically or internationally, against other major issues of social policy or criminal law enforcement.


Full Transcript

 View Transcript

Episode Details
Published: September 21, 2016
Podcast: Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast
Category: Law School , Legal News , Security
This Podcast
Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast
Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast

Planet Lex is a series of conversations about the law, law and society, law and technology, and the future of legal education and practice. In other words, a bunch of interesting stuff about the law.

  iTunes   Google Play
More Episodes
05/22/17
“Entrepreneurs Are the New Rock Stars”: A Conversation with J.B. Pritzker and Howard Tullman

J. B. Pritzker and Howard Tullman talk about what it takes to pursue innovation in business.

04/24/17
How the Government is Handling Online Privacy and Cybersecurity

This legal podcast covers net neutrality, online privacy, cybersecurity, and how the government is handling these growing issues.

03/15/17
The Supreme Court, Neil Gorsuch, and the Nuclear Option

Carter Phillips talks about the current state of the Supreme Court in 2017.

02/15/17
Trump Administration and the Law

In this episode of Planet Lex, host Daniel Rodriguez interviews Northwestern Law faculty members Deborah Tuerkheimer, Andrew Koppelman, and Eugene Kontorovich about President Trump's...

12/14/16
The Future Impact of Technology on the Legal Profession

Professor Richard Susskind talks about whether law schools are sufficiently training law students to be the pioneering attorneys of tomorrow.

11/16/16
Law Enforcement and Implicit Bias

A discussion on implicit bias, tensions between police and the communities they serve, and how perceptions of race impact the legal system.