Featured Guests
Patrick Fuller

Patrick Fuller is the Director of Corporate Solutions for Datacert|TyMetrix Legal Analytics. Patrick is often referred to as one...

Bill Sowinski

Bill Sowinski is the Director of Decision Support Services for Datacert|TyMetrix. In that capacity, Bill works with clients to...

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Jared Correia

Jared D. Correia, Esq. is the CEO of Red Cave Law Firm Consulting, which offers subscription-based law firm business...

Analytics is basically data analysis focused on distilling information useful for improving processes and decision making, often in a business context. When applied to law firms, analytics can be used to improve client intake, increase the firm’s efficiency, and identify silos. How is this possible? How can simply collecting and analyzing data affect your law firm’s fees and revenue?

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Jared Correia interviews data analytics specialists Patrick Fuller and Bill Sowinski about the analysis of current trends in the legal field, why and how a law firm should implement analytics, and the recommended technologies and processes for big and small law firms. Fuller discusses current trends in the Am Law 200, the Top 200 U.S.-based law firms ranked by revenue according to the American Lawyer magazine. He talks about how Am Law’s metrics are emblematic of the market and how this directly correlates to law firm revenues. Sowinski discusses why metrics and analytics are increasingly important for a law firm to be successful in the future. If used properly, analytics can become a differentiating factor for the firm and increase client intake. While big law firms can afford expensive technology and experts, Sowinski explains, small law firms can still use analytics by planning and implementing discipline to capture data. In the future of the legal field, Sowinski says, analytics won’t just be beneficial, they’ll be necessary.

Patrick Fuller is Director of Corporate Solutions for Datacert|TyMetrix Legal Analytics. Patrick has made an art form of translating big data into intelligence for use in business development and organizational strategy. He has more than 17 years of experience in the legal profession.

Bill Sowinski is the director of decision support services for Datacert|TyMetrix Legal Analytics. He works with clients to structure and analyze their legal data, facilitating the development and deployment of measured strategies and supporting policies designed to improve performance. Previously an insurance defense lawyer, Sowinski is a litigation expert and a pioneer in the legal analytics space.


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Episode Details
Published: February 5, 2015
Podcast: Legal Toolkit
Category: Intellectual Property , Legal Technology
This Podcast
Legal Toolkit
Legal Toolkit

Legal Toolkit highlights services, ideas, and programs that will improve lawyers' practices and workflow.

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