Featured Guests
Britt Lorish

Britt Lorish, is a partner with Affinity Consulting Group, where she regularly consults for law firms and legal departments on best use...

Your Host
Sharon D. Nelson

Sharon D. Nelson is president of the digital forensics, information technology, and information security firm Sensei Enterprises. In addition...

Jim Calloway

Director of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program, Jim Calloway is a recognized speaker on legal technology issues,...

Ten years ago, dictation and speech recognition were clunky, inefficient, and inaccurate softwares. As the technology emerged, lawyers tried programs like Dragon Dictation, but most decided that speech solutions were not practical or worth using. Today, these softwares are much more accurate and useful for many lawyers, but maintain a similar reputation. How have dictation and speech recognition changed from the past and who can benefit most from them now? Will they work with the programs lawyers are already using in their law firms?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview law firm consultant Britt Lorish about today’s speech recognition and dictation solutions, added benefits of current dictation software, common misconceptions about Dragon NaturallySpeaking, and the best microphones and apps to consider. Lorish explains that most lawyers who use dictation have embraced digital recording and filing, but many lawyers are still wary of using speech recognition softwares due to previous bad experiences. She talks about using softwares from dictation vendors like Philips, BigHand, and Winscribe in the cloud, and how Dragon is lagging in cloud-based usability. Additionally, Lorish discusses custom commands, a system of automating commonly-used commands like adding a signature block, opening a document template, or inserting standard client/attorney language. These speech solutions, Lorish says, can greatly help lawyers with disabilities, those who type slowly, and can even help younger lawyers improve oral argument abilities. If you are holding back due to the previous reputation, you might want to reconsider the benefits of dictation and speech recognition.

Britt Lorish is the managing partner of Affinity Consulting Group’s Virginia office. She is a former litigation paralegal and a former law firm network administrator. Lorish is certified in a wide variety of law office software and regularly consults with law firms throughout North America, Europe, and the Caribbean on legal technology, legal accounting, and practice management issues. She is also a former chair of ABA TECHSHOW.

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Episode Details
Published: March 10, 2015
Podcast: The Digital Edge
Category: Legal Technology
This Podcast
The Digital Edge
The Digital Edge

The Digital Edge, hosted by Sharon D. Nelson and Jim Calloway, covers the latest technology news, tips, and tools.

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