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David Rubenstein

David Rubenstein

Professor Rubenstein is James R. Ahrens Chair in Constitutional Law and Director of the Robert J. Dole Center for Law and Government at Washburn University School of Law. He currently teaches constitutional law, administrative law, legislation, and jurisprudence.

Professor Rubenstein has written extensively in the areas of constitutional law, administrative law, artificial intelligence, immigration, and procurement Law — usually at the intersection of two or more of those subjects. His scholarship has been published in Boston University Law Review, Fordham Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, UCLA Law Review, Vanderbilt Law Review, William & Mary Law Review, and other distinguished journals. Professor Rubenstein’s work has been widely cited in law journals, and several federal judicial opinions. His most recent article, “Acquiring Ethical AI”, is forthcoming in Florida Law Review in Summer 2021.

Prior to teaching, Professor Rubenstein clerked for The Honorable Sonia Sotomayor when she was a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and for The Honorable Barbara Jones in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

He also served for three years as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York, where he specialized in immigration and argued several issues of first impression before the Second Circuit. In private practice, Professor Rubenstein worked for five years as an associate in King & Spalding’s New York office, where he represented major corporate clients in a wide array of commercial litigation matters.

Professor Rubenstein served as editor-in-chief (2016-2020) of Administrative & Regulatory Law News, published quarterly by the American Bar Association. In 2020, he received the Volunteer of the Year award from the ABA Section of Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice.

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Guest Appearances
March 12, 2021

Texas vs. United States

Who will win this battle of Immigration and Federalism?