Podcast category: Best Legal Practices

ABA Law Student Podcast

Communication Tips that Combat Gender Bias

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Sandy Gallant-Jones speaks with McDermott Will & Emery partner Andrea Kramer about her new book, Breaking Through Bias: Communication Techniques for Women to Succeed at Work, and gender equality in the workplace. Andrea recalls the life experiences and occupational observations that motivated her and her husband to write their new book and expresses how important it is that women find ways to succeed in the workplace. She provides her tips to help women purposefully counter bias in the office and breaks down the four attributes, like cultivating the right attitude for success and maintaining high self awareness, for attuned gender communication. Andrea gives examples of how men in the workplace can also improve their communication with their female colleagues and closes the interview with her most important advice for women who have recently graduated from law school as they start their careers.

Andrea S. Kramer is a partner in the international law firm of McDermott Will & Emery LLP where she heads the firm’s Financial Products, Trading and Derivatives Group. She is a founding member of the firm’s Diversity Committee and co-chair of the Gender Diversity Subcommittee. She previously served on both the firm’s Management and Compensation Committees. Andrea co-founded (2005) and now serves as chair of the Board of the Women’s Leadership and Mentoring Alliance (WLMA), a 501(c)(3) corporation that brings professional women together to mentor and support leadership opportunities for women of all stages of their careers.

Un-Billable Hour

How to Make the CLE Experience A Better One

When attorneys find themselves needing to take continuing legal education courses, many of them regard the experience as a burden, boring, or simply an unavoidable chore. However, what if the problem isn’t with the CLEs themselves but with the attitudes of the attorneys? What can providers do to change the opinions and perceptions of attorneys regarding the CLEs? In this episode of The Un-Billable Hour, host Christopher Anderson speaks with AttorneyCredits.com Director of Legal Education Jason Castillo about how to make the CLE experience a better one.

As an attorney and Director of Legal Education with Attorney Credits, Jason Castillo researches diverse legal topics and emerging areas of law to create and produce CLE courses with significant current intellectual content. Jason has also created numerous courses on pertinent topics, including legal ethics and technology, malpractice, elimination of bias, and other key subjects. A graduate of the University of San Diego School of Law, he is a licensed member of the State Bar of California.

ABA Journal: Legal Rebels

Dewey B Strategic’s Jean O’Grady leads lawyers through the tech maze

Most people see librarians as the quiet personification of technical obsolescence. Jean O’Grady is out to change that. The senior director of research and knowledge at DLA Piper in Washington, D.C., is at the forefront of pushing the legal industry toward embracing technology as a means of enhancing the practice of law. Through her acclaimed blog, Dewey B Strategic (which has been selected for the ABA Journal Blawg 100 every year since 2012), as well as through numerous public appearances and interviews, O’Grady informs lawyers about what the current legal tech landscape looks like and what kinds of innovative tools are at their disposal.

The Digital Edge

Metadata Management and Daily Best Practices

In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk with PayneGroup CEO Donna Payne about ways attorneys can better handle their metadata. Donna reminisces about starting her company in 1998, the client experience that inspired the creation of her Metadata Assistant software, and The Wall Street Journal’s front page article mention that resulted in 150,000 downloads. She analyzes how metadata has changed since she started and provides a list of things, such as track changes and hidden text, that lawyers should be on the lookout for. She states that one of the best things you can do if you can’t afford a third party assistant program is to know what is in the document and use any free options available in your preferred office software suite. Donna closes the interview with an explanation of what exchangeable image file format data is, her checklist of the most common metadata mistakes that lawyers make, and some daily best practices that lawyers can implement to help protect their data.

Donna Payne is the founder and serves as chief executive officer of PayneGroup, Inc. She is a member of the American Bar Association, the American Society of Journalists and Authors, and the Project Management Institute. In addition Donna is an original member of the Microsoft Legal Advisory Council. She is a frequent speaker at legal and technical conferences worldwide and has spoken to Congressional committees, the Senate, and at international judicial conferences on the subject of metadata and preventing accidental disclosure.

Special thanks to our sponsors, ServeNowCloudMask, and Scorpion.

ABA Journal: Asked and Answered

Is it time to leave your current job?

Are you unhappy at work? Is it time to leave your job, or should you look for other options to improve your current work conditions? Trust your intuition, and don’t beat yourself up with negative thoughts about workplace problems being all your fault, says Gayle Victor, a Chicago-area lawyer and social worker who counsels attorneys and their families. She spoke with the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward in this month’s Asked and Answered podcast.

 Gayle Victor is a lawyer who also has a master’s degree in social work. She uses her unique perspective as a former attorney to provide counseling to attorneys and their families through CareForLawyers.com. Her practice is based in Chicago.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Digital Detectives

Cyber Security for Small Firms and Solo Practices

In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program Director Jim Calloway about ways small firm and solo attorneys can improve their cyber security. Jim talks about the increased awareness of cyber security in the solo and small law firm community as a result of the recent news coverage of data breaches occurring in a variety of companies. This level of visibility and growing pool of attorneys who have personal experience with someone who has had a data breach or digital disaster has cultivated an understanding that a compromised database or dead computer can put the entire law firm out of business. He states that seeing these large companies being compromised can often cause small firms with much smaller budgets to question if there is anything they can do to protect themselves. Jim points out that attorneys running their own firms or small businesses have a duty to supervise their employees and provides his 5 top cyber security tips to help these very firms and solo lawyers protect themselves, their clients, and address the importance of physically securing company laptops and other mobile devices. He closes the interview with an analysis of the risks and rewards of utilizing cloud-based practice management tools designed specifically for legal professionals and his advice for law firms who feel that they can’t afford to adequately secure themselves.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: President Linda Klein’s Year To Come

“I went to law school because I wanted to help people” ~ Linda Klein

The ABA Annual Meeting marks both the end and beginning of leadership as the organization marches into the future. This time On The Road, hosts Lynae Tucker and Chris Morgan, the student editor and the 12th Circuit Governor for the ABA Law Student Division sit down with incoming ABA President Linda Klein, who is the 140th person to head the American Bar Association, at the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting.

They discuss Linda’s early pro bono work for the elderly and her upcoming programs designed help our nation’s veterans. In addition, Linda tells us about her decades long involvement with the American Bar Association and how forging early relationships helped guide her career. She encourages lawyers to volunteer and citizens to vote. In addition, she believes that lawyers need to play a part to ensure the next generation receives a good primary education.

Linda Klein is the current President of the American Bar Association. In her practice life, she is managing shareholder for the Georgia offices of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, LLP. She has practiced law for over 30 years in Atlanta focusing on dispute resolution practice, in the areas of construction, pharmaceutical, and education law. Over the years, she has held many leadership positions at the American Bar Association including Special Advisor to the Standing Committee on Membership, Special Advisor on the ABA Program, Evaluation, and Planning Committee, Member of the Women Rainmakers Committee, and many more.

Thinking Like a Lawyer - Above the Law

Pokémon’s Evolving Legal Landscape

Joe and Elie chat with Drew Rossow of the law office of Gregory M. Gantt in Dayton, Ohio, and author of Gotta Catch… A Lawsuit? about the legal challenges surrounding Pokémon Go. It’s worth noting that technology moves fast, and since recording this episode, Niantic has released updates via Pokemon Go that have begun to address how both players and businesses can “opt out” and “opt into” the game, along with addressing some safety concerns with more interactive disclaimers.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: Emerging issues in Law Enforcement and National Security

This time On the Road at the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting, host Joe Patrice speaks with Alsop Louie Partners “partner” Gilman Louie, Electronic Privacy Information Center President and Executive Director Marc Rotenberg, and Advisory Committee for the American Bar Association Standing Committee on Law and National Security Chair Harvey Rishikof about emergent technology’s effect on law enforcement and national security. Mark shares that listening to the FBI director talk about the problems he’s encountering with encryption and how these issues make it more difficult for law enforcement agencies to gain access to evidence was a very interesting portion of the “Emerging Issues in Law Enforcement and National Security” panel. He states that It’s better to have stronger encryption because we’re no longer simply talking about privacy and surveillance, but rather the internet of things and you want that to be secure because it’s a matter of public safety. Gilman emphasizes that law enforcement agencies have many more tools today than they did 10 or 15 years ago simply because of digital exhaust and that, despite challenges to reading encrypted messages, it’s very hard to operate without leaving a digital footprint. Harvey explains that cyber threats fall into four categories: criminals, “hacktavists”, espionage, and war, and that delineating those statutory regimes is incredibly complicated. The group discusses why tracking, attributing, and classifying cyber attacks requires such caution, and they close the interview with an analysis of machine learning and online algorithmic transparency.

Gilman Louie is a partner at Alsop Louie Partners and the founder and former CEO of In-Q-Tel, a strategic venture fund created to help enhance national security by connecting the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. intelligence community with venture-backed entrepreneurial companies. He completed the Advanced Management Program/International Seniors Management Program at Harvard Business School and received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from San Francisco State University.

Marc Rotenberg is president and executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) in Washington, DC. He teaches information privacy and open government at Georgetown Law and frequently testifies before Congress on emerging privacy and civil liberties issues. He testified before the 9-11 Commission on “Security and Liberty: Protecting Privacy, Preventing Terrorism.” He has served on several national and international advisory panels, and currently serves on expert panels for the National Academies of Science and the OECD. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Stanford Law School, and received an LLM in International and Comparative Law.

Harvey Rishikof is currently chair of the Advisory Committee for the American Bar Association Standing Committee on Law and National Security and serves on the Board of Visitors for the National Intelligence University (NIU). He was a Professor of Law and National Security Studies at the National War College (NWC) in Washington, DC. and is the former chair of the Department of National Security Strategy at the NWC. He specializes in the areas of national security, civil and military courts, terrorism, international law, civil liberties, and the U.S. Constitution.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: Korematsu v. United States

This time On the Road at the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting, host Kareem Aref speaks with founder and executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute Karen Korematsu about her father’s landmark case, Korematsu v. United States. Karen explains that the case challenged the military orders and the constitutionality of the Japanese American incarceration during World War II and that In 1983 evidence was found that proved there was no military necessity for the internment. She recalls growing up in Oakland, California, being blamed for the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the bullying and discrimination she and her brother suffered because they were Asian American. It was not until she studied U.S. history as a junior in high school that she was made aware of the Korematsu v. United States case and her father’s 1944 Supreme Court hearing. Karen compares the societal attitude of her youth to the political climate of today and discusses the recent evocation by a Virginia mayor of Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Order 9066 during his call for area governments and nongovernmental agencies to suspend and delay any further assistance to Syrian refugees. She closes the interview with examples of how her organization fights bigotry through education and her thoughts on what we can do today to avoid the mistakes of the past.

Karen Korematsu is the founder and executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute and the daughter of the late Fred T. Korematsu. In 2009, on the 25th anniversary of the reversal of Fred’s WWII U.S. Supreme Court conviction, Karen established the Fred T. Korematsu Institute.  In May 2013, Karen became executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute and led its transition in July 2014 to become an independent organization fiscally sponsored by Community Initiatives.

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