Podcast category: Security

Digital Detectives

Electronic Security Sweeps for Law Firms and their Clients

As a lawyer, sometimes paranoia is a good thing. Legal professionals are constantly handling sensitive information that needs protection, whether it’s details about a case or client data. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Charles Patterson about TSCM (technical surveillance countermeasures) and how this extra level of security can ensure your private information stays private. As the president of Exec Security, a TSCM services company, Charles shares about why lawyers need TSCM, how these sweeps are performed, and provides tips on how to protect yourself from situations that could compromise your confidential information.

Charles Patterson has over 35 years experience in the security field. Previous to his current position as Exec Security president, he spent 17 years traveling throughout the United States and the world working in executive protection and providing tech support to security teams.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

Digital Detectives

Smishing, a Growing Cyber Security Threat

Just because phishing is gradually becoming less of a threat does not mean you are safe from cyber criminals. Smishing is the use of cell phone texting software to lure victims into downloading malware or handing over personal information. In this episode, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Joe Hamblin, director of IT operations for Sprint, about what smishing is, why it’s growing, and how it could affect your legal business. They also discuss simple ways to identify and combat smishing both in your personal and professional life.

Joe Hamblin, director of IT operations for Sprint’s emerging platforms, has more than 25 years of IT experience. In his current position he is responsible for end-user platform engineering including collaboration, Identity Access Management (IAM) and device engineering/management.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

 

Digital Detectives

The Ransomware Epidemic in Law Firms: A Guide to Defense and Survival

To those unfamiliar with ransomware, it is a malicious software that effectively holds your files hostage until you pay a ransom. For lawyers, this could mean losing or compromising the data that keeps your business running smoothly. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss this malware with the CEO of LMG Security, Sherri Davidoff. Sherri divulges what we know about ransomware, what to do when it has infected your computer, and how to prevent data loss. While there are few ways to stop the infection when it has started, backing up your information and educating your team on malware countermeasures can significantly lessen ransomware’s impact on your business.

Sherri Davidoff is the CEO of LMG Security, a cybersecurity and digital forensics company. She has more than a decade of experience as an information security professional, specializing in penetration testing, forensics, social engineering testing and web application assessments.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Defending Against DDoS Attacks

When discussing legal technology many attorneys perceive their cyber security risk as low and easily manageable. In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the recently distributed denial of services attacks that disrupted hundreds of websites, what makes you vulnerable to these attacks, and how lawyers can better defend themselves.

In the second segment of the podcast, Dennis and Tom discuss an artificial intelligence concept known as “human in the middle” and how AI will augment the future practice of law. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

On the Road

ATL APP 2016: Don’t Believe the Hype: Cybersecurity and the Cloud

Many attorneys can feel huge pressure from their peers to utilize cloud based technologies in an attempt to stay competitive within the legal marketplace. In this report from On The Road, hosts Joe Patrice and Elie Mystal speak with Estey & Bomberger LLP Of Counsel Jeff Bennion, Bressler, Amery & Ross, P.C. Principal Denver Edwards, and MyCase Legal Technology Evangelist Nicole Black about the professional advantages provided by cloud based technologies and the steps lawyers can take to mitigate the cybersecurity risks these technologies expose them to.

Jeff Bennion is a trial lawyer from San Diego. He is the Education Chair for the State Bar of California’s Law Practice Management and Technology Section.

Denver Edwards represents corporations and individuals in federal and state regulatory investigations and counsels regulated entities on data security.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, NY attorney and the legal technology evangelist at MyCase. She authored the book “Cloud Computing for Lawyers,” and has spoken and written extensively about the intersection of law, mobile computing, and internet-based technology.

Thomson Reuters: Down the Hall with Practical Law

Privacy and Data Security: Understanding the Legal Landscape

 

In this episode of Thomson Reuters Down the Hall with Practical Law, Privacy & Data Security Senior Legal Editor Mel Gates covers cybersecurity and privacy issues. Mel recalls the career journey that led her to Practical Law and covers why it can be challenging for organizations to understand and comply with the myriad regulations surrounding data security. She explains how the most successful companies handle compliance, breaking down which industries are especially at risk for data breaches and why they are attractive targets for hackers. She also discusses how lawyers can help companies understand the fiscal and legal repercussions associated with a data breach and aid them in managing that risk. Mel closes the interview with a conversation about current trends in regulatory obligations and data breach litigation and provides resources that you can use to stay up to date with changes in data security regulations.

The Florida Bar Podcast

No Law Firm is Too Small for Cyber Security

 

Some small law firms and solo practitioners feel that their practice and available revenue is too small to invest resources into cyber security protections. In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, hosts Jonathon Israel and Christine Bilbrey talk with Shook, Hardy & Bacon partner Al Saikali about helping lawyers assess their security risk and why cyber security is important even for the smallest firms.

Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast

The Regulation of Public Corruption

In this episode of Planet Lex, host Daniel Rodriguez speaks with Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Harry R. Horrow Professor in International Law Juliet Sorensen about the pervasiveness and regulation of corruption. Juliet defines public corruption as the abuse of public office for private gain and discusses the challenges of working within the various parameters of both civil causes of action and criminal law to regulate said corruption. Certain forms of malfeasance, like bribery, have been traditionally governed by criminal law while other forms like patronage and nepotism have been grounds for civil actions under the First Amendment but have generally been found not to be either federal, state, or local crimes. Juliet highlights that in a functioning democracy the safeguard against public officials who the electorate disapproves of is voting them out of office. However, if corruption has pervaded a democracy to the extent that voting public officials out of office cannot be done in a free and fair way, then that is an impingement of human rights. She shares that many countries are unable or unwilling to regulate public corruption for a myriad of reasons, including limited resources and weak institutions, and that in some countries the culture of corruption is so pervasive that it becomes incredibly difficult to change. Juliet also analyzes the International Olympic Committee’s decision not to ban Russia from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and discusses how the McLaren Investigation Report on doping in Russia illustrates abuses of all levels of public office but not necessarily for monetary gain. She closes the interview with an investigation of how the emergency reconstruction phase after major extreme weather events can facilitate corruption and how we can combat this. Finally, she considers the severity of public corruption, domestically or internationally, against other major issues of social policy or criminal law enforcement.

Digital Detectives

Encryption, Cyber Security, and Domestic Surveillance

In the wake of the Panama Papers breach, securing law firm and client data has been a huge concern for many practitioners in the legal space. Similarly, other information leaks like the Edward Snowden revelations have made the general public more aware of government surveillance than ever before. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with executive director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation Cindy Cohn to discuss domestic surveillance concerns, encryption technology, and how lawyers and law firms can protect themselves and their clients from cyber attacks.

Cindy Cohn is the executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. From 2000-2015 she served as EFF’s Legal Director as well as its General Counsel. Ms. Cohn first became involved with EFF in 1993, when EFF asked her to serve as the outside lead attorney in Bernstein v. Dept. of Justice, the successful First Amendment challenge to the U.S. export restrictions on cryptography.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: Driverless Cars

The transition from cars with drivers to driverless cars is upon us, and it will be potentially as disruptive as horse and buggies to cars. As this switch-over occurs, lawyers and lawmakers will face issues of compliance, liability, and information governance, among others. In this On the Road report from the ABA Annual Meeting 2016, Joe Patrice interviews Bryant Walker Smith, Laura Ruettgers, and Stephen Wu about their conference presentation on driverless cars. Together, they discuss the compliance issues that arise from different levels of vehicle automation, who is liable for an accident, how the insurance carriers will adapt to the changes, and the moral questions that arise on a programming level. The presenters close by discussing how taxi and trucker employment will change and driverless cars as a supplement to public transportation.

Bryant Walker Smith is an assistant professor of law and (by courtesy) engineering at the University of South Carolina School of Law. His research focuses on risk (particularly tort law and product liability), technology (automation and connectivity), and mobility (safety and regulation).

Laura Ruettgers is with the law firm of Severson & Werson where she specializes in providing coverage and policy drafting advice for environmental and toxic tort claims and policies. Laura also has extensive experience addressing issues arising under commercial general and excess liability, professional liability, and directors and officers liability policies.

Stephen Wu is of counsel with Silicon Valley Law Group. He advises clients on information governance matters, focusing on information security, privacy, mobile computing, ediscovery preparedness, records management, and computer-related investigations.

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