Podcast category: Legal Technology

Law Technology Now

The Evolution of the Digital Courtroom

In this episode of Law Technology Now, host Bob Ambrogi talks with Opus 2 International, Inc. CEO Graham Smith-Bernal about his career and the evolution of the electronic courtroom. Graham recalls his early interest in becoming a court stenographer and how at the age of 23 he had the opportunity to establish his company Smith Bernal International. At that time he noticed that the legal industry was driven heavily by precedent and tradition and that he could use technology to establish his company as a service differentiator. Graham was also aware that a lot of lawyers are technophobic, so any software he developed had to be easy to use and with the advent of real time transcription he came up with the idea for LiveNote. He shares that there was a lot of pushback and reticence in the early days, but by exercising the ease of use, increase in efficiency, and leveraging end user feature requests the product became mature as a piece of tech. Graham states that success in any business is about timing and your process and the increase in processing speeds and maturity of the stenography systems availability at the time put his company slightly ahead of the technological curve. He discusses the success of LiveNote and explains how he developed the Opus 2 magnum platform. He closes the interview with an analysis of electronic courtroom evolution and the trends he is currently seeing in tech assisted litigation.

Graham Smith-Bernal started his career as a court reporter in the UK, and founded Smith Bernal International, where he created the LiveNote software. Smith Bernal International went on to become the world’s largest international court reporting company and LiveNote became the most widely used litigation support software prior to Smith-Bernal selling LiveNote to Thomson Reuters in 2006. He then founded Opus 2, where he is currently CEO, to continue his work in this area.

ABA Law Student Podcast

Finding Alternative Careers in the Law

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Sandy Gallant-Jones talks with Above the Law Editor Joe Patrice, CuroLegal CEO Chad Burton, LegalZoom General Counsel Chas Rampenthal, Clio Lawyer in Residence Joshua Lenon, and Legal Talk Network Executive Producer Laurence Colletti about alternative careers in law. Joe opens the interview by advising law students to experiment if they are unsure as to what they should do with their practices. Chad reminds young lawyers that they can create their own career alternatives, there are many different ways of getting into existing fields outside of the law, and that graduates don’t have to be lawyers. Chas cautions law students to remember that their peers are going to be the captains of industry and that it is beneficial to treat everyone respectfully, use this time to make connections, and understand that the law is evolving and that you must evolve with it. Josh shares that most lawyers in their first jobs leave outside of five years and that young attorneys should be okay with moving on if their interests change or if they are unhappy with where they are occupationally. Laurence talks about a few of his struggles during law school and encourages students to find ways to be successful in their studies that works well for them. The group discusses their thoughts on how technology and the law will commingle in the future, how law schools can better accommodate and prepare students for emergent technology, and closes the interview with thoughts on how we can make law school a better learning experience for students.

Joe Patrice is an editor at Above the Law. For over a decade, he practiced as a litigator at both Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton and Lankler Siffert & Wohl, representing a variety of individuals, institutions, and foreign sovereigns in criminal and civil matters. Then Joe left private practice to concentrate on making snide remarks about other lawyers which is at least as fulfilling as motion practice.

Chad Burton is the founder of Burton Law, one of the leading virtual law firm structures. Formerly in a big law firm, he now represents technology-oriented companies from startups to multinational corporations. Additionally, he started CuroLegal, an outsourced practice management company for lawyers.

Chas Rampenthal has served as general counsel for LegalZoom since 2003 and as corporate secretary since 2007. Before joining LegalZoom, Chas was a partner at Belanger and Rampenthal, LLC and an associate at Testa, Hurwitz & Thibeault, LLP and Thelen Reid & Priest LLP. He also served as an officer and aviator in the United States Navy. Chas received his B.S. in economics and math studies from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville and a J.D. from the University of Southern California.

Joshua Lenon is the lawyer in residence at Clio, an intuitive cloud-based legal practice management solution. He can be reached at [email protected]. An attorney admitted to the New York Bar, Joshua brings legal scholarship to the conversations happening both within Clio and with its customers.

Laurence Colletti serves as the executive producer at Legal Talk Network where he combines his passion for web-based media with his experience as a lawyer. Previously, he was a solo practitioner and consultant in general business and commercial real estate.

The Digital Edge

Metadata Management and Daily Best Practices

In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk with PayneGroup CEO Donna Payne about ways attorneys can better handle their metadata. Donna reminisces about starting her company in 1998, the client experience that inspired the creation of her Metadata Assistant software, and The Wall Street Journal’s front page article mention that resulted in 150,000 downloads. She analyzes how metadata has changed since she started and provides a list of things, such as track changes and hidden text, that lawyers should be on the lookout for. She states that one of the best things you can do if you can’t afford a third party assistant program is to know what is in the document and use any free options available in your preferred office software suite. Donna closes the interview with an explanation of what exchangeable image file format data is, her checklist of the most common metadata mistakes that lawyers make, and some daily best practices that lawyers can implement to help protect their data.

Donna Payne is the founder and serves as chief executive officer of PayneGroup, Inc. She is a member of the American Bar Association, the American Society of Journalists and Authors, and the Project Management Institute. In addition Donna is an original member of the Microsoft Legal Advisory Council. She is a frequent speaker at legal and technical conferences worldwide and has spoken to Congressional committees, the Senate, and at international judicial conferences on the subject of metadata and preventing accidental disclosure.

Special thanks to our sponsors, ServeNowCloudMask, and Scorpion.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Our Tech Innovation Wish List

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, hosts Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss their dreams for future tech innovations, the ways technology is currently failing us, and the strong reactions consumers are having to the rumors that the new iPhone 7 will not have a traditional headphone jack. Dennis shares that the catalyst for this show topic was a recent experience with aggressive drivers that made him recall a traffic accident he was in. The recklessness of the drivers and the distraction that resulted in his crash made him think that perhaps the world needs driverless vehicle technology more than ever before. Tom further emphasizes this sentiment by referencing several recent stories of individuals who, while driving, experienced heart attacks or other medical emergencies and utilized driverless car technology to safely and expediently reach the hospital. He states that humanity has to get use to the idea that computers can do things as well as, if not better than we can, and driving might be one of the last places that this occurs. Both hosts provide their wish lists of tech innovations that could improve their everyday lives, including intelligent voice recognition software that understands the context of spoken requests and a dashboard that provides sophisticated multi-platform social media management. They end the first segment with their thoughts on how these advancements could greatly benefit lawyers.

In the second segment of the podcast, Dennis and Tom explore why consumers are having such a negative reaction to the rumors that Apple’s iPhone 7 will not come with a headphone jack. Dennis remarks that traditional tech is disappearing faster than ever before and wonders if this is another sign of our technological future that society will have to get use to. Tom thinks that consumers are concerned about their previous tech investments, like top quality headphones, becoming obsolete and reminds us all that technology always changes and that you can either accept that evolution or give up the technology altogether. They both speculate how removing the headphone jack and utilizing the lightning port could potentially innovate the headphone as a platform. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Legal Toolkit

Using Content Marketing to Grow Your Law Practice

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, founder and president of Sword and the Script Media, LLC. Frank Strong talks with Heidi Alexander about content marketing and why it’s so important for lawyers. Frank starts by defining content marketing, a business process for creating and distributing relevant and valuable content, and briefly explains how this process can help lawyers build trust with their existing and prospective client base. He lists a few content marketing characteristics, like working consistently and ensuring that you own your distribution channel, and emphasizes that your content creation efforts should focus mainly on whichever platform you own. Frank encourages attorneys to seek client-oriented questions to help them in the content creation process and to use their own anecdotal style to guarantee a unique brand. He warns lawyers to establish a consistent publishing schedule, manageable with their busy lives, and reiterates that sustainability is the goal. Frank also instructs legal professionals to view their social media outlets as satellites that operate around, and integrate into, their main content hub. He lists his content marketing best practices, like clear documentation and iterative improvement focused progress, and provides a few examples of what makes a good marketing strategy. Frank closes the interview with a reflection on how content marketing has changed over the years and some emerging trends he sees for the future.

Frank Strong is the founder and president of Sword and the Script Media, LLC, a veteran-owned business based in Atlanta focused on PR, content marketing and social media services.  However, most folks in the legal community will recognize him from his previous assignment as the communications director for the LexisNexis software division in Raleigh. During his tenure at LexisNexis he was the primary champion behind the LexisNexis Business of Law Blog, which garnered tens of thousands of visitors from the legal community every month and earned praise from likes of Forbes.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney and Scorpion.

Digital Detectives

Cyber Security for Small Firms and Solo Practices

In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program Director Jim Calloway about ways small firm and solo attorneys can improve their cyber security. Jim talks about the increased awareness of cyber security in the solo and small law firm community as a result of the recent news coverage of data breaches occurring in a variety of companies. This level of visibility and growing pool of attorneys who have personal experience with someone who has had a data breach or digital disaster has cultivated an understanding that a compromised database or dead computer can put the entire law firm out of business. He states that seeing these large companies being compromised can often cause small firms with much smaller budgets to question if there is anything they can do to protect themselves. Jim points out that attorneys running their own firms or small businesses have a duty to supervise their employees and provides his 5 top cyber security tips to help these very firms and solo lawyers protect themselves, their clients, and address the importance of physically securing company laptops and other mobile devices. He closes the interview with an analysis of the risks and rewards of utilizing cloud-based practice management tools designed specifically for legal professionals and his advice for law firms who feel that they can’t afford to adequately secure themselves.

Jim Calloway is the Director of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program and is a recognized speaker on legal technology issues, Internet research, law office management, and legal ethics. In addition to running the Law Practice Tips blog, he writes articles for noted legal magazines, including Law Practice Management and Law Technology News.

Special thanks to our sponsors, PInow and SiteLock.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: What’s Next? Tech’s Top Counsel Reveal All

What do the in-house legal departments of Uber, Salesforce, and Oculus look for when hiring outside counsel? And, what advice do such high-profile attorneys have for advancing careers? The answers might surprise you. In this report from On The Road, host Joe Patrice interviews the chair and former chair of the ABA Section of Science & Technology Law, Cynthia Cwik and Heather Rafter, at the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting.

The duo recaps the group’s ABA Annual Meeting session, titled “What’s Next? Tech’s Top Counsel Reveal All!” which featured speakers Uber GC Salle Yoo, Salesforce GC Amy Weaver, and Oculus Associate GC Amy Fox. In it, they reveal how today’s tech general counsels are working with outside counsel as well as what they expect from these external advisors. In today’s world, it’s not enough to notify your client of a problem, you must also provide possible solutions with that initial message. Tech GCs aren’t required to have a science background; attorneys with interpersonal skills and ability to communicate coupled with an adequate understanding of technology will also be considered.

Stay tuned as our guests talk about their (serendipitously) all-women panel and discuss diversity, work-life balance, the need to take risks for advancement, and the importance of exercise and mindfulness.

Cynthia Cwik is chair of the ABA Section of Science & Technology Law. In her practice life, she works at the San Diego Office of Jones Day as a litigator who has handled a variety of complex matters, including class actions, mass tort matters, consumer fraud actions, and product liability actions. She has extensive experience in cases involving issues of science and technology.

Heather Rafter is the former chair of the ABA Section of Science & Technology Law. In her practice life, she works at RafterMarsh US, a law firm that she started where she works as a part time GC to a variety of companies. Prior to that, she was a litigator for Gibson, Dunn, & Crutcher LLP.

ABA Journal: Legal Rebels

Jerome Goldman’s work gives a voice to SCOTUS arguments

The license plates on Jerome Goldman’s Subaru Legacy reads “OYEZ,” in honor of his U.S. Supreme Court-focused multimedia archive. Now at age 71, Goldman, named a Legal Rebels Trailblazer by the ABA Journal, says he has some more “ephemera” that he hopes will get on the site, which is moving from Chicago-Kent College of Law to Cornell University’s Legal Information Institute. “This means passing along my knowledge gained over 25 years, plus offering complete details regarding my workflow,” says Goldman, who believes that his political science education was instrumental in understanding judicial behavior.

On the Road

ABA Annual Meeting 2016: Driverless Cars

The transition from cars with drivers to driverless cars is upon us, and it will be potentially as disruptive as horse and buggies to cars. As this switch-over occurs, lawyers and lawmakers will face issues of compliance, liability, and information governance, among others. In this On the Road report from the ABA Annual Meeting 2016, Joe Patrice interviews Bryant Walker Smith, Laura Ruettgers, and Stephen Wu about their conference presentation on driverless cars. Together, they discuss the compliance issues that arise from different levels of vehicle automation, who is liable for an accident, how the insurance carriers will adapt to the changes, and the moral questions that arise on a programming level. The presenters close by discussing how taxi and trucker employment will change and driverless cars as a supplement to public transportation.

Bryant Walker Smith is an assistant professor of law and (by courtesy) engineering at the University of South Carolina School of Law. His research focuses on risk (particularly tort law and product liability), technology (automation and connectivity), and mobility (safety and regulation).

Laura Ruettgers is with the law firm of Severson & Werson where she specializes in providing coverage and policy drafting advice for environmental and toxic tort claims and policies. Laura also has extensive experience addressing issues arising under commercial general and excess liability, professional liability, and directors and officers liability policies.

Stephen Wu is of counsel with Silicon Valley Law Group. He advises clients on information governance matters, focusing on information security, privacy, mobile computing, ediscovery preparedness, records management, and computer-related investigations.

Paralegal Voice

Advice to Help Lawyers and Law Firms Go Paperless

In this episode of The Paralegal Voice, host Vicki Voisin talks with the State Bar of Michigan practice management advisor JoAnn Hathaway about her tips to help law firms go paperless. She shares that there are many procedural steps involved in transitioning a company from a traditional filing structure to a paperless system and that it’s imperative to have a paperless policy to ensure that no one deviates from the process. She encourages any company embarking on this conversion to take inventory of their goals for going paperless and to decide what the firm hopes to accomplish by making this change. JoAnn then goes into her top ten policies that firms should implement if they are going paperless, like making your policy searchable and developing a feedback and monitoring system to determine the success of the transition, and closes the interview with suggestions of resources that law firms can utilize to simplify the process.

JoAnn L. Hathaway is a practice management advisor for the State Bar of Michigan. Ms. Hathaway previously worked as a legal liability claims director and risk manager, paralegal, and legal administrator. She is an Adobe Acrobat Certified Expert, and holds software certifications in LexisNexis Time Matters and Billing Matters software. She is active in the ABA Law Practice Division, serving on the Publications Board, Law Practice Today Editorial Board, and State and Local Bar Outreach Committee. She is a frequent speaker on law firm technology, insurance, and risk and practice management topics.

Special thanks to our sponsors, Boston UniversityNALA, and ServeNow.

Page 4 of 39« First...23456...102030...Last »