Podcast category: Legal Technology

Special Reports

ATL Converge: Pitching the Mainstream Media

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Above the Law Converge panelists John Hellerman and Casey Sullivan after their discussion in the panel Pitching the Mainstream Media. Ambrogi asks the panel about how lawyers should engage with members of the media, including crafting a pitch and building relationships. Additionally, the panelists discuss the value of a traditional press release and what “mainstream media” means for lawyers today.

John Hellerman is a partner and co-founder of Hellerman Baretz Communications, a corporate PR agency that works directly with law firms.

Casey Sullivan is the editorial director of Biglaw Business, a business of law community website recently launched by Bloomberg.

Special Reports

ATL Converge: Emerging Technical Trends

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Above the Law Converge panelists Dan Lear, Tasha Cooper, Mike Schmidt, Ryan Lytle, and Joe Patrice about Emerging Technical Trends and Best Practices. Together they discuss lawyers blogging and what it means to be “part of the social media conversation.” Additionally, the panelists address the issues of oversharing, setting goals and calculating marketing success, and why every lawyer should be on LinkedIn.

Dan Lear is the director of industry relations for Avvo, an online legal services marketplace.

Tasha Cooper is the president of Upward Action where she does social media training and runs paid advertising campaigns on social media networks for attorneys.

Mike Schmidt is vice-chair of the labor and employment department at the law firm of Cozen O’Connor and a prominent legal blogger.

Ryan Lytle is head of social media and community for Mashable, a news website that provides information and resources about digital innovation.

Joe Patrice “makes jokes about law firms on the internet.” Editor at Above the Law, he moderated the Emerging Technical Trends and Best Practices panel.

Special Reports

ATL Converge: The Future of Law

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Dr. Silvia Hodges Silverstein, Rakesh Madhava, Jess Hunt, and Elie Mystal, about the Above the Law Converge panel The Future of Law. Together the panelists discuss how technology is changing the procurement process and legal purchases, the need for legal business models to adapt to current economic standards, and whether artificial intelligence will render lawyers obsolete in the future.

Dr. Silvia Hodges Silverstein is the executive director and founder of Buying Legal Council, an organization for those working in procurement and sourcing legal services.

Rakesh Madhava is CEO of Nextpoint, an evidence management service based in the cloud for lawyers to manage their electronic data.

Jess Hunt is the managing director at Axiom Law, the largest provider of tech-enabled legal services and compliance services.

Elie Mystal “makes fun of people online for money.” He is the managing editor of Above the Law Redline and the editor-at-large of Breaking Media.

Special Reports

Are You Thinking Like A Lawyer Yet?

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Elie Mystal and Joe Patrice, Above the Law editors and hosts of the new podcast Thinking Like A Lawyer. Elie and Joe discuss how the new podcast came about and their plans to misdirect future guests. If you enjoy this short interview, Thinking Like A Lawyer is right for your ears.

Special Reports

What About Above the Law and Breaking Media?

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews John Lerner, CEO of Breaking Media, and David Lat, Founder and Managing Editor of the Above the Law blog at the 2015 ATL Convergence conference in New York City. Lerner discusses the history of Breaking Media, how they joined with Above the Law, and their relatively recent acquisitions, Breaking Defense, Breaking Energy, and Breaking Gov. Tune in to hear more about the companies and the conference.

John Lerner is CEO of Breaking Media and has 20 years of experience in B2B and niche consumer markets starting at Inc. Magazine, and later running the online businesses of BPI Communications, VNU Business Media, Nielsen Business Media, and F+W Media.

David Lat is the founder and managing editor of Above the Law. His writing has also appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and many other publications.

The Florida Bar Podcast

Admission on Motion, Reciprocity, the UBE, and Non-Lawyer Licensing

Three controversial issues relating to The Florida Bar admissions and the future of the practice as a whole are currently being discussed. The Florida Bar is considering whether to endorse the adaptation of the following programs. Admission on Motion, or reciprocity, deals with the concept of lawyers legally crossing state borders to practice law. The Uniform Bar Examination (UBE) allows lawyers to take a test and acquire a portable bar examination score usable in any state that accepts the UBE (16 currently do). Finally, there is a question of whether the state of Florida should adopt some form of non-lawyer licensing. The Bar Admissions Committee of The Florida Bar’s Vision 2016 Commission is currently studying these issues closely.

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, Adriana Linares and John Stewart interview lawyer and chair of the Bar Admissions Committee Lance Scriven about the pros and cons of Admission on Motion, the Uniform Bar Examination, and non-lawyer legal professional licensing. Scriven discusses the practitioner benefits of crossing borders and practicing law and points out that there are many instances in which this is already being done. The obvious negative in these programs involves lawyers who are worried about even more competition in a state which is already saturated with attorneys. Stewart points out that many services that these alternative solutions provide are filling a currently existing hole in the market of moderate or low income people and small business owners. Admission on Motion, the UBE, and non-lawyer licensing are strong alternatives to the competition being created by online legal services which already exist to fill this void. Florida is watching the action of major states like New York or California on these issues, Scriven says. Tune in to hear more about these controversial and important decisions facing Florida lawyers.

Lance Scriven is an attorney in Tampa, Florida, with the Trenam Kemker Law Firm. He practices as a commercial litigator and has been at the firm for 13 years collectively. Scriven is a member of The Florida Bar Board of Governors and Chair of the Bar Admissions Committee of The Florida Bar Vision 2016 Commission.

New Solo

How David Sparks Started His Solo Practice

In the last episode of New Solo, we heard about how Michael Downey left his big law firm to start a solo practice. But with all of the small decisions involved in going solo, each lawyer’s experience is different. David Sparks is a lawyer and self-identified geek who left his small firm of three attorneys to start his own practice. As he is tech savvy, Sparks’ process differed from Downey’s in several ways.

In this episode of New Solo, Adriana Linares interviews David Sparks about why he decided to go solo, the first actions he took, and struggles he encountered during the process. Sparks’ first steps involved evaluating the potential costs of research, insurance, malpractice, and other legal necessities, and comparing it to an assumed client income. He talks about being a lawyer who uses Apple products and how he chose, or didn’t choose, products like Ruby Receptionists, Clio, Rocket Matter, and Omnifocus. Sparks also discusses the importance of marketing his new solo practice and how setting up the business and accounting aspects took longer than he thought it would. If you are considering starting a solo practice, this podcast is a good place to start.

David Sparks has been a lawyer in Orange County, California for 21 years and recently started a solo practice. He is also a technology expert who has a blog, a podcast, and often writes about finding and using the best tools, hardware, and workflows for Apple devices. David also writes for Macworld magazine and often speaks about legal technology.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Solo Practice University.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

A Few of Our Favorite (Tech) Accessories

Lawyers often focus on the core elements of hardware technology: computers, tablets, and smartphones. However, the best experiences with hardware are driven by and dependent on the way we accessorize and personalize them. Most people choose their technology accessories based on word-of-mouth recommendations from friends, family, colleagues, or other connections. So what are lawyers using and buying today?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell talk about accessorizing technology, discuss some of their favorite accessories, and recommend ways lawyers can accessorize their smartphones, laptops, and tablets. Kennedy and Mighell have some favorites that they want to share and they would like to hear about your favorites too!

Bags (How you carry your laptop while traveling):

Smartphone and iPad Cases (Protect your technology):

Power Strips and Extension Cords (Charging your devices in a conference room, airport, hotel, or car):

Audio/Headphones:

What Kennedy and Mighell don’t yet have:

 

In the second section of the podcast, Kennedy and Mighell discuss multi-factor authentication. While there are several options of apps and systems to avoid hackers, all lawyers should consider ways in which to make their accounts more secure. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

The Florida Bar Podcast

Goals and Plans for the Vision 2016 Technology Committee

An increase in online legal service providers has become an intimidating factor for many lawyers across Florida and The United States. People are looking towards emerging online technologies for their legal service needs. But should we as lawyers really be worried that these new legal options are going to “take all our jobs?”

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, Adriana Linares interviews Florida attorney John Stewart, chair of the Florida Bar’s Vision 2016 Technology Committee, about how the subcommittee is helping lawyers cope with and embrace new legal technology. Stewart explains that he was previously wary of legal service technology, but his opinions changed after talking to Mark Britton from Avvo, Cheryl Niro from the ABA, Ed Walters from Fastcase, and other experts. The Technology Committee, he says, is already helping lawyers work alongside new technology through the Practice Resource Institute and an e-etiquette guide. His plans for the future include looking at the proliferation of online legal service providers and finding ways for Florida lawyers to compete or collaborate.

John Stewart is a third-generation Florida attorney who primarily practices commercial litigation and dispute resolution at the law firm of Stewart, Evans, Stewart & Emmons, P.A. He is on the Florida Bar Board of Governors in the 19th Circuit and serves as chair of the Vision 2016 Technology Committee.

The Digital Edge

Speech Recognition and Dictation Solutions for Today’s Lawyer

Ten years ago, dictation and speech recognition were clunky, inefficient, and inaccurate softwares. As the technology emerged, lawyers tried programs like Dragon Dictation, but most decided that speech solutions were not practical or worth using. Today, these softwares are much more accurate and useful for many lawyers, but maintain a similar reputation. How have dictation and speech recognition changed from the past and who can benefit most from them now? Will they work with the programs lawyers are already using in their law firms?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview law firm consultant Britt Lorish about today’s speech recognition and dictation solutions, added benefits of current dictation software, common misconceptions about Dragon NaturallySpeaking, and the best microphones and apps to consider. Lorish explains that most lawyers who use dictation have embraced digital recording and filing, but many lawyers are still wary of using speech recognition softwares due to previous bad experiences. She talks about using softwares from dictation vendors like Philips, BigHand, and Winscribe in the cloud, and how Dragon is lagging in cloud-based usability. Additionally, Lorish discusses custom commands, a system of automating commonly-used commands like adding a signature block, opening a document template, or inserting standard client/attorney language. These speech solutions, Lorish says, can greatly help lawyers with disabilities, those who type slowly, and can even help younger lawyers improve oral argument abilities. If you are holding back due to the previous reputation, you might want to reconsider the benefits of dictation and speech recognition.

Britt Lorish is the managing partner of Affinity Consulting Group’s Virginia office. She is a former litigation paralegal and a former law firm network administrator. Lorish is certified in a wide variety of law office software and regularly consults with law firms throughout North America, Europe, and the Caribbean on legal technology, legal accounting, and practice management issues. She is also a former chair of ABA TECHSHOW.

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