Podcast category: Legal Technology

Special Reports

2015 ABA TECHSHOW: The Authors of Your Favorite Legal Technology Books

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti and Kennedy-Mighell Report host Dennis Kennedy interview legal technology authors Allison Shields, Dan Siegel, and Tom Mighell about the Author’s Track at the 2015 ABA TECHSHOW. Together, they discuss the challenges in writing for lawyers and what it was like to present during the Author’s Track at the conference. Shields, Siegel, and Mighell all urge lawyers to make a couple of changes in their technological processes in order to have a more efficient practice.

Allison Shields is the president of Legal Ease Consulting in Long Island, NY. She helps lawyers with the business end of their companies including marketing and development, fees, time management, and efficiency.

Dan Siegel is a practicing attorney from the suburbs of Philadelphia and a consultant who works with attorneys to help manage and improve their workflow. He is a nationally-known writer and lecturer about technology in law offices and in litigation.

Tom Mighell is vice president and senior consultant with Contorall, helping companies develop information governance and litigation readiness programs. Mighell is also the co-host of Legal Talk Network’s own Kennedy-Mighell Report podcast.

The Digital Edge

Why the iPad is the Best Tablet for Litigators

Most lawyers who listen to The Digital Edge are already aware of many benefits of tablet use in the courtroom. There are apps for note taking, document review, legal research, and, of course, trial presentation. But this is just the beginning! Having a tablet opens up many avenues of convenience for litigators, trial prep and during trial. Why is the iPad preferable to a Windows Surface or Android tablet?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview The Kennedy-Mighell Report host Tom Mighell, lawyer and author of “iPad in One Hour for Litigators,” about why the iPad is the best tablet for litigators and how to best use the tools and applications available on the iPad. Mighell makes many suggestions about which apps are most useful for litigation, including apps for note taking, case intake, document transfer, discovery, legal research, and trial presentation. In addition, he recommends accessories for data input (handwriting or keyboard) and data output (evidence presentations or a printer). Most importantly, he emphasizes, lawyers should never assume they know how to use an app just because they downloaded it. Make sure you practice using every application before you enter the courtroom.

Tom Mighell is a vice president and consultant at Contoural, where he helps companies develop defensible information governance and litigation readiness programs. He is the author of a number of books on the iPad, including “iPad in One Hour for Lawyers”, “iPad Apps in One Hour for Lawyers”, and “iPad in One Hour for Litigators”, which is now in its second edition. Mighell is co-host of the Legal Talk Network podcast The Kennedy-Mighell Report with Dennis Kennedy.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Special Reports

2015 ABA TECHSHOW: The Legal Technology Audit with Casey Flaherty

Legal Talk Network Producer Laurence Colletti interviews Casey Flaherty about his Plenary Session at the 2015 ABA TECHSHOW in Chicago. Flaherty, an Austin-based lawyer, is well-known for creating the Legal Technology Audit (LTA), a test of basic technological proficiency for lawyers and in-house corporate departments. In the interview, he discusses his path to creating the LTA, the ethical minimum of technological knowledge for lawyers, and why this is important for lawyers and clients.

Topics include:

  • Creating the LTA and developing it with Andrew Pearlman
  • The myth of the digital native
  • Recommendations for technologically deficient law students or lawyers
  • Flaherty’s new career as a legal department consultant
  • Using the velocity metric to calculate wasted time

After being in-house counsel at Kia Motors for four years, Casey Flaherty has recently started his own consultancy practice focusing on empirically based approaches to legal quality and legal spend management for in-house departments.

Special Reports

2015 ABA TECHSHOW: The Ethical Duty of Technological Competence with Andrew Perlman

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti and ABA Journal legal affairs writer Victor Li interview plenary speaker Andrew Perlman at the 2015 ABA TECHSHOW in Chicago. Perlman discusses how the lawyer’s ethical duty of competence is evolving and what level of technological proficiency is reasonably expected today. He covers the most basic knowledge of Adobe Acrobat, Microsoft Word, and Microsoft Excel to automated document assembly and cybersecurity.

Topics Include:

  • Basic/ethical competency with Word, Excel, and Adobe Acrobat
  • Training a law firm for future efficiency
  • Taking the Legal Technology Audit at any level
  • Digital marketing, social media, e-discovery, and new law

Tune in to hear why lawyers have an ethical responsibility to their clients and how this knowledge can increase success within their practice.

Andrew Perlman teaches civil procedure and professional responsibility at Suffolk University Law School where he also directs the Institute on Law Practice Technology and Innovation.

Special Reports

2015 ABA TECHSHOW with Chair Brett Burney and Vice-Chair Steve Best

On the first day of the 2015 American Bar Association TECHSHOW in Chicago, Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti, and hosts Adriana Linares and Tom Mighell sit down with ABA Techshow Chair Brett Burney and his successor, Steve Best. Together, they discuss highlights from the first day including tracks about Microsoft Office, cloud computing, and other current legal technology. While Burney and Linares rave about the free advice and networking the conference provides, Best creates some excitement about the 2016 TECHSHOW (hint: it’s a special anniversary). Lawyers and legal professionals, if you’re excited about the buzz of ABA TECHSHOW, tune in for this exclusive first look!

The Florida Bar Podcast

Director Jonathon Israel on How the Practice Resource Institute Benefits Florida Lawyers

Many lawyers who are part of the Florida Bar do not realize what the Practice Resource Institute (PRI) has to offer. The PRI is an online resource for lawyers who need help with office technology, finance and accounting, marketing, management, or who need assistance with all aspects of starting a new practice. Much of the content is free to the public and there are additional services available to members.

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, Adriana Linares interviews Jonathon Israel, director of The Florida Bar Practice Resource Institute. Israel discusses how the PRI has developed to offer a myriad of new opportunities available to any lawyer (not just Florida Bar members). He describes the structure of the site and the types of information, resources, and tools you should expect from visiting the PRI website or becoming a member. In the future, Israel explains, the PRI will respond to member feedback to include more video and audio content, social media interaction, and aggregation.

Jonathon Israel is the director of the Practice Resource Institute. He has been with the Florida Bar for thirteen years, starting at the help desk and working his way up through the Information Technology Department. As long-time operations manager for the Bar’s IT department, he brings a strong technology background to the PRI.

Legal Toolkit

Why Do Lawyers Love Wearable Technology?

Lawyers as a group have the reputation for being slow to adopt new technology. However, when the smartphone emerged, they quickly jumped on board. And due to cloud computing, lawyers are able to work anywhere, using their smartphones and tablets. Wearable technologies like the Apple Watch, other smart watches, and Google Glass seem to be relatively popular in the legal field. So why do lawyers love wearables, how are they using them, and what does the future of wearable technology look like?

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Jared Correia interviews lawyer and legal technology expert Nicole Black about how and why lawyers adopt mobile and wearable technology, how they are using tablets, smartphones, and smart watches in their practice, the role of cloud computing, and what to watch for in the legal ethics of wearables. Black discusses how the spread of cloud computing has made mobile computing possible by reducing battery and storage constraints. From there, she says, smart watches are the lawyers’ solution to impolite interruptions and the inconvenience of situations in which phones are not allowed. Also, most people are comfortable wearing a watch already (we used to wear them before smartphones). Black believes smart watches will be the gateway to Google Glass, or something similar, as we all become more comfortable with the constant presence of technology. Tune in to learn about some amazing ways lawyers have already used wearable technology and some ethical factors to consider.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York-based attorney and the legal technology evangelist at MyCase, a law practice management software company. She is the author of the American Bar Association’s “Cloud Computing for Lawyers” and the co-author of the ABA’s “Social Media: The Next Frontier.” Black authors a weekly column for The Daily Record and has written numerous other articles. She is a frequent speaker at conferences on the subject of the intersection of law, mobile computing, and Internet-based technology.

In-House Legal

Cyber Security: Using Insurance to Motivate Technology

The public and private sectors are equally struggling with cyber security issues. Despite the development of innovative problem-solving technologies and systems, many small, medium, and large companies are still at great risk of a cyber attack. The government cannot regulate these attacks without proper access to business information and the private sector needs government aggregation of widespread data. What is the true value of information sharing and how can cyber insurance greatly assist in this process of creating better cyber security?

In this episode of In-House Legal, Randy Milch interviews Peter Beshar, executive vice president and general counsel of Marsh & McLennan, about his path to becoming general counsel and how businesses should approach the issue of cyber security. Beshar started at Marsh & McLennan immediately after a civil action was filed against them by Attorney General Eliot Spitzer in 2004. He discusses how he dealt with being a new general counsel at a business in crisis. With stocks down, ratings down, and clients, banks, and employees upset, he learned to be relentlessly positive and to make strong decisions. General counsel and in-house lawyers alike can benefit from his knowledge and experience.

After the break, Beshar discusses cyber security risks and how they affect the private and public sectors. He explains Enterprise Risk Management (ERM): technological innovations coupled with cyber insurance which drives and modifies people’s behavior. Additionally, he says, the government should interact with private businesses to share cyber threat indicators and provide widespread information about preventing cyber attacks. The issue of cyber risks is incredibly prevalent in businesses of any size today, and it is important that we create long-lasting systems for preventative measures.

Peter Beshar is the executive vice president and general counsel of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. He has a wealth of experience as a public servant, as a prominent big law firm litigator, and as general counsel for a global enterprise. Beshar is widely known for his experience with cyber risk insurance.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Adopting Legal Technology: A Human Problem?

The history of legal technology projects, both in specific firms and generally, is too often a showcase of half-completed and failed projects. In a recent blog post called “The Human Barrier to LPM Technology: Will Lawyers Get to the Future?” Pam Woldow and Doug Richardson assess and analyze this history and the reasons for it. What are the barriers lawyers create around adopting higher levels of technology?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss why legal technology projects fail, the human element of legal technology, and why Woldow and Richardson’s blog post should launch some important conversations. When addressing the fundamental problems lawyers have with technology (a common subject) Kennedy believes lawyers seek an unachievable standard; they want something impossibly intuitive and easy to use that fills all management and accounting needs. He also mentions that efficiency technologies are counter-intuitive to the billable hour. Mighell believes that lawyers will only adopt technology through client or management pressure and encouragement. In the end, they both agree that technology can be used to streamline or automate busywork, leaving more time for quality legal analysis.

In the second half of this podcast, Kennedy and Mighell discuss strategies for conducting a survey. They mention the benefits of different tools like SurveyMonkey and Google Forms, and how law firms can benefit from asking for feedback. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

ABA Journal: Asked and Answered

Would your practice be prepared if something happened to you? These tips can give you peace of mind.

If the unthinkable happens, will your practice be ready for an intermediary to take over or help with a transition?  Do you know what would happen if you–or one of your colleagues–should suddenly die or become incapacitated? The ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with two experts about tools and systems you can put in place to give you and your clients peace of mind.

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