Podcast category: Legal Technology

The Digital Edge

Lawyers Love New Apple Products: iPhone 6, Apple Pay, and Apple Watch

There are many exciting new Apple products available now or launching in the near future. Many lawyers love to use Apple products in their practice and personal lives and are often eager to learn about the newest change in the technology or services. The iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, and iOS 8 were released in September 2014, Apple Pay launches in October 2014, and the Apple Watch is set to be released in the spring of 2015. If attorneys want to know about what’s new, there is one lawyer who is an expert on all Apple products: Jeff Richardson.

On this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview attorney and iPhone J.D. blog writer Jeff Richardson about the new Apple products and services, what he recommends for lawyers, and predictions for the future of technology. Richardson starts by describing the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, differences from previous iPhones, and size and storage recommendations for lawyers using a smartphone in their practice. He gives some suggestions for essential accessories including a case, external battery, additional cables, and bluetooth headphones. Richardson then describes new iOS 8 features such as predictive text and interactive notifications, how the Apple Watch will change the future of wearable technology, and what Apple Pay means for consumers and vendors. Although Apple is always coming out with new products, it is a particularly exciting time for lawyers and technology.

Jeff Richardson is a partner in the New Orleans office of Adams and Reese LLP. His practice focuses on defending companies sued in class actions and complex litigation, as well as appellate litigation. Richardson publishes iPhone J.D., the oldest and most comprehensive website for attorneys who use iPhones and iPads.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Wrongfully Convicted: William Dillon and His Life in Prison

Imagine being 20 years old and being investigated for a murder you didn’t commit. Would you know what to say or do? Failure to react correctly could cost you a lifetime in prison. Sound far-fetched? It might surprise you to learn that it happens more often than we think, and for somewhat predictable reasons. In this special edition of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host J. Craig Williams interviews William Michael Dillon, a man who spent nearly 30 years behind bars in one of the country’s most dangerous prisons for a crime he did not commit, and Seth Miller, one of the attorneys who helped overturn his conviction. Tune in to hear how false confessions, eyewitness misidentification, and corrupt jail-house snitches are costing innocent people their freedom, and learn why William isn’t angry today and how finding a voice through writing music helped him find hope.

William Dillon served 27 years and 8 months of a life sentence for a murder he did not commit. The State of Florida released him in 2008 when DNA testing proved he was not linked to a key piece of evidence used to convict him. He is a singer and songwriter whose work was inspired by his long incarceration in Florida State Prison. Today, he advocates for organizations, including the Innocence Project of Florida, that were instrumental in setting him free.

Seth Miller is one of the attorneys who helped exonerate William Dillon. He works for the Innocence Project of Florida where he has dedicated himself to exonerating the innocent since 2006. His organization receives nearly 2,000 requests to review convictions per year. Mr. Miller’s focus is on post-conviction cases that have DNA in evidence.

Specail thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

 

Legal Toolkit

Virtualization of a Law Practice

There has recently been an increase in virtualization of law practices and the rate at which firms are beginning to adopt internet-based technology solutions. There are significant advantages attached to those programs including mobility, flexibility, ease of installation and management, and decreased setup cost. But most lawyers don’t know what a virtual office entails, are wary of trusting a remote server, or worry about the security of working through a browser. What is virtualization, how does it apply to law firms, and why should lawyers be adopting this new technology now?

On this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Jared Correia interviews AbacusLaw CEO Alessandra Lezama about cloud-based case management systems and why lawyers should virtualize their firms. Lezama explains the difference between desktop as a service (DaaS) and software as a service (SaaS), the benefits of virtualization, and how to choose a company to help with this process. The encrypted remote servers should have geographic redundancy, regular and thorough security audits, and have local data centers. Lezama points out that lawyers are hesitant towards virtualization due to anxiety of the unknown or lack of time, resources, or knowledge but they must adopt new technology as a matter of ethical compliance. Because there are so many intricacies to this process, many lawyers do not know where to start. Lezama encourages attorneys to invest time, perform due diligence, and seek a good partner to help guide the process. In the long run, the relief of IT burden will more than pay off.

Alessandra Lezama is the chief executive officer of Abacus, a legal technology solution company that designs, installs, and manages virtual practice systems. Before joining Abacus, she was chairman of the board and chief executive officer of two Blackthorn Investment Fund companies, chief operating officer and CEO at American Internet Services, and has held key leadership roles in sales, marketing, and operations for Comsat International.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Surveying 2014 Legal Technology Surveys

Most of us assume that lawyers are slow adopters of technology because that’s what we hear all the time. ILTA’s InsideLegal Survey and the ABA Technology Survey are annual surveys of lawyers that provide some data about the actual usage of technology by lawyers. Because these surveys are voluntary, they give a big picture of changing trends rather than specific accurate data. Does the common assumption that lawyers are technologically behind still hold true in 2014?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell analyze the results of 2014 ILTA-InsideLegal survey, the 2014 ABA Technology Survey and recommend ways lawyers can use these surveys to benefit their practice or clients. Mighell notices that in 2014 lawyers are adopting fewer new technologies compared with an increase in mobile technology and cloud computing from the previous two years. He explains that the major purchases have been pretty standard: hardware upgrades, server upgrades, and new laptops and desktops. Although Kennedy also noticed the lag in exciting results from the surveys, he emphasizes that these surveys are voluntarily taken by lawyers interested in technology, so there might be more progress in less tech savvy demographics. He also mentions the most exciting lawyer technology trends mobile, virtualization, cloud services, wearable technologies, and discusses the shift in tablet use and security.

In the second segment, Kennedy and Mighell discuss why young lawyers do not often attend legal technology conferences, how they could benefit from the conferences, and the disconnect between what young lawyers think they know about technology and what they still need to learn. Listen to the end for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

The Digital Edge

Microsoft Office 365 for Lawyers is Here!

Lawyers now have the option to purchase Microsoft Office 365 for their small, medium, or big law firms. Microsoft Office 365 is a collection of products and services that can be purchased individually or in bundles known as stockkeeping units (SKUs). The products available include Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SharePoint, Microsoft Lync, Yammer, Office Suite 2013, and Matter Center. These provide everything from document management, email and contacts, voice and text communication, to a corporate social network. How might these services benefit a law firm and what questions should lawyers be asking?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Microsoft expert and technologist Ben Schorr about the Office 365 services and products as they pertain to use in a law firm. Schorr answers some of the often asked questions concerning the difference between Office 365 and Office Suite 2013, cloud based information storage, collaboration and sharing, and the way that Microsoft’s pricing differs from other software providers. He wraps up the interview by explaining the differences between SharePoint and Matter Center for document management and advises lawyers and legal professionals to do online research and work with a Microsoft partner before deciding on products for a firm. There are many options to pick and choose from for a firm of any size, from solo to big law.

Ben M. Schorr is a technologist and Chief Executive Officer for Roland Schorr & Tower, a professional consulting firm headquartered in Flagstaff, Arizona with offices in Hawaii and Oregon. He has been involved with management and technology for more than 20 years and a Microsoft MVP for more than 15. He is the author of several books and articles on technology including “The Lawyer’s Guide to Microsoft Outlook,” “The Lawyer’s Guide to Microsoft Word,” and “OneNote in One Hour.”

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Analyzing the Latest Apple Announcements

With fall fast approaching, you can be sure of two things: football games and new phones! Apple and other vendors recently announced new editions of their phones, as well as some interesting new gadgets. With new options like the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, Apple Watch, iOS 8, and Apple Pay, Apple-using lawyers need to think about which products they need (or want) and how to make the best use of them. But what about those lawyers who have moved to other product vendors such as Android? Most lawyers could use an update on the newest technology to make informed autumn purchases.

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the new Apple devices, thoughts on the new features of iOS 8, and what lawyers should think about if they haven’t already purchased a new phone lately. They discuss the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, embracing the “phablet”, and how most people use their smartphone as more of a mobile computer than a phone. They also discuss other new products such as the Samsung Galaxy Note, the Apple Watch, the Moto 360 watch, and why lawyers might prefer Android or Apple products. With the release of iOS 8 comes new exciting features such as extensions, alternate keyboards, and widgets, but both Kennedy and Mighell had to deal with long downloading times. They wrap up the first part of this podcast by examining the future of Apple Pay, why it might succeed where Google Wallet failed, and how lawyers could utilize these changes to get ahead in their practice.

After the break, the Kennedy and Mighell discuss the Apple Watch and other wearable technology in more detail. As people begin to use wearable devices to gain and save information, the amount of discoverable data will increase immensely and it will be important for lawyers to pay attention. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Digital Detectives

Rule 37(e) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: Changes for ESI Preservation and Spoliation

In 2006, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure rule-makers developed and put into practice amendments dealing with electronically stored information (ESI) and e-discovery. However, most of those involved believed these amendments did not adequately deal with lost or missing ESI or “the spoliation issue.” In 2014 the rule-makers proposed Rule 37(e), which deals with the issue of spoliation equally across all federal courts, resolving the issue of inherent authority, or judges making decisions individually for each case. What are these changes and how will they affect the way businesses deal with e-discovery and data preservation?

In this episode of The Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview ESI preservation expert James Kurz about how Rule 37(e) works and what the consequences are for the future of ESI preservation. Kurz explains that the rule, which only deals with ESI, proposes a three part test before considering spoliation issues: the ESI should have been preserved in the anticipation or conduct of litigation and is lost, the ESI was lost because the party failed to take reasonable steps to preserve the information, and the missing information cannot be restored or replaced with additional discovery. If this test is passed, the federal court may then impose remedies, or if intention is proved, order more serious sanctions. He explains that Rule 37(e) will make a more homogenous legal process for e-discovery, and will solve some of the controversy surrounding the costs of ESI preservation and e-discovery for businesses. Although the rule faces the Judicial Court, Supreme Court, and then Congress, Kurz believes it will go through and be effective in December 2015.

James Kurz is a partner in the Alexandria VA law firm of Redmon, Peyton & Braswell LLP. His practice focuses on business litigation, including computer, software, and communications technologies cases. He also has an emphasis in the challenge of electronic discovery and the issues of information governance and co-wrote the white paper The Long-Awaited Proposed FRCP Rule 37(e), Its Workings and Its Guidance for ESI Preservation.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Digital WarRoom.

Un-Billable Hour

Why Legal Marketing Cannot Be Left to the Marketers

Many lawyers believe they are not benefiting from the time and money spent on marketing their firm. Online marketing can seem complicated and time-consuming and most lawyers do not want to seem self-promoting so hiring marketers seems like the best option. However, the fact is that marketing a personal brand is both necessary and not as hard as it seems. Especially in solo and small practices, lawyers are marketing their reputation every day by building relationships online and in their offline communities. But in a field where everyone is doing the same thing, where should a lawyer start and how does he or she stand out from the crowd?

In this episode of The Un-Billable Hour, Christopher Anderson interviews legal marketing consultant Mary Beth Monzingo about the importance of marketing a personal brand, how lawyers can start building relationships and connections with potential clients, and tips to a successful online marketing strategy. Monzingo encourages lawyers to market themselves at all times whether working with a client on a case or while engaging in outside hobbies and activities. Additionally, lawyers need to attend networking conferences, connect with other lawyers, stay in touch with law school alumni, and be an active part of associations and organizations. Online, lawyers should be available on most social media outlets, create valuable content, have a ‘call to action’ on their website, and always maintain a consistent presence. Monzingo encourages every lawyer to spend 2-5% of their revenue on marketing in order to see an increase of 10% or more. And, don’t forget, consistency is key.

Mary Beth Monzingo is the managing partner of Monzingo Legal, a consulting company for legal marketing and management, business development, and law firm recruiting. A specialist in helping lawyers start and build their law practices, she has consulted with hundreds of attorneys in structuring successful firms, implementing marketing departments and strategies, and recruiting top talent for expansion and growth.

Special Reports

Facilitating Discovery and Small Firm Technology with D. Casey Flaherty

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Casey Flaherty, a speaker in two events at the LegalTech West Coast conference. The events included discussions about facilitating discovery, maintaining good rapport during government investigations, and how to begin working with regulatory bodies. Flaherty examines how technology can help smaller law firms compete and client billing perspective. Casey Flaherty, corporate council for Kia Motors, developed a basic technology competency audit for law firms and has appeared on several Legal Talk Network podcasts.

 

 

Special Reports

Robot Lawyers with Tim Hwang: LegalTech Interview

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews legal engineering and development specialist Tim Hwang at the LegalTech West Coast conference. Together, they discuss using technology to automate and streamline legal services, how these automation systems affect solo and small firm marketing, and the ABA’s concerns over quality control. Hwang is the junior partner for Robot, Robot, and Hwang, a research and development startup and law firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area. At LegalTech,Tim took part in the speaking event titled, “Competitor or Frenemy.”

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