Podcast category: Legal Technology

Lunch Hour Legal Marketing

The Summer of Lunch Part 3: What Exactly Is The Purpose of Social Media?

Lawyers who listen to podcasts or read marketing blogs will have heard many times over that they should be using social media to market their practices. But who has time to maintain Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram, and multiple other social media accounts? Furthermore, what really is the purpose of an online social presence for a law practice? Can lawyers really attract clients through social media?

In this episode of Lunch Hour Legal Marketing, Jared Correia interviews Leigh McMillan, vice president of marketing at Avvo, during Mass LOMAP’s 5th Annual Marketing Conference in Boston. Leigh explains the importance of participating in social media, how a lawyer’s presence can affect search results, and how to choose the right channel to increase your law firm’s visibility online.

Topics include:

  • How lawyers can attract clients on social media
  • Showcasing knowledge on Facebook
  • Google search results tied to Google+
  • Creating snackable content for YouTube
  • Accurate naming for searchable information
  • Opportunities for lawyers on Tumblr
  • The importance of having a mobile website
  • Developing your social profile and owning your real estate

Leigh McMillan is vice president of marketing at Avvo, an online legal services marketplace featuring lawyer profiles and ratings. Before joining Avvo, Leigh worked for Marchex’s Call Analytics business.

Tweet about this series using the hashtag #summeroflunch!

Special Reports

ABA Annual Meeting 2015: President Hubbard’s Year in Review

“Our regulatory system, developed at the state level during the 19th century and workable during much of the 20th century, no longer facilitates the delivery of quality, reasonably priced legal services where it is needed.” – Catharine Arrowood

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews American Bar Association Immediate Past-President William Hubbard at the 2015 ABA Annual Meeting. Together they discuss his year as president including the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, the historic U.S. Supreme Court session, crisis in confidence in the criminal justice system, and changes in the legal marketplace due to legal technology. Hubbard finishes the interview with suggestions for future ABA presidents and his plans after such a busy year.

William Hubbard was president of the American Bar Association from 2014-2015 and is a partner at Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP in Columbia, South Carolina, where he practices in business litigation.

Special Reports

Educational Institutes at NALA’s Convention Part 1

The National Association for Legal Assistants (NALA) recently held their 40th Annual Convention, Institutes, and Exhibition in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The conference offered educational programs for CLE credits applicable to many paralegal associations nationwide. Legal Talk Network host Vicki Voisin attended and interviewed instructors from some of the CLE “institutes.”

In this podcast, Voisin interviews Peter McGrath about issues in environmental law, Penni Bradshaw about immigration law for paralegals, and Jeff Bennion and Karin Scheehle about why it is important for legal professionals to stay on the edge of legal technology. Together they discuss topics including the case of Burlington Northern v. United States, ethical responsibilities of immigration law, data security, and how paralegals can improve their skills in any of these fields of law. Tune in for tips from the experts.

Peter McGrath is a lawyer at Moore & Van Allen in Charlotte, North Carolina, where he practices environmental law. He lead the Environmental Law Institute at the NALA convention.

Penni Bradshaw is an attorney with Constangy Brooks Smith & Profitt in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She specializes in labor and employment law and immigration. At the conference, she led the Immigration Institute.

Karin M. Scheehle, ACP, is a paralegal at Gallagher & Kennedy law firm in Phoenix, Arizona, where she works in litigation. She specializes in legal technology as it relates to litigation. She teaches ethics and other classes at the Phoenix College ABA Approved Paralegal Program.

Jeff Bennion is an attorney out of San Diego, California, where he practices primarily in personal injury law, mass torts, and products liability. He teaches an ABA program at UCSD and the paralegal program. Jeff and Karin lead the Legal Technology Institute at the convention.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Summer Reading for the Tech-Savvy Lawyer

While sunbathing on the beach, on vacation, or on a lazy summer weekend many people (including lawyers) read technology books, nonfiction, literature, or, if we’re like Tom, post-apocalyptic science fiction. Due to technology like Kindles and iPads, many people have changed how they read, but is technology affecting the summer reading tradition?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the changing nature of reading (or listening to) books, talk about modern ways of reading, and share summer reading lists and ideas. They weigh the benefits and downfalls of paper books vs. tablets, consider different systems of hybrid reading, and wonder why millennials seem to embrace old-fashioned print books (perhaps they look better beside a craft beer while listening to a vinyl record). The hosts wrap up the section with their own summer reading suggestions including useful technology books for lawyers and several of their favorite novels from this summer. Dennis concludes by emphasizing that reading is alive and well, only now people are reading in whatever way suits them best!

In the second half of the podcast, Dennis and Tom discuss how The Florida Bar has dramatically changed their stance on technology. A notoriously strict state when it comes to ethical rules against online advertising and other legal tech, Florida Bar President Ray Abadin and Past-President Greg Coleman have made huge strides including the Practice Resource Institute, technology member benefits, and goals to make technology education a CLE requirement. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Is This the Golden Age of Podcasting?

In the last couple of years, the number of great podcasts has exploded. Many people today not only know the word “podcast,” but can give you several examples of their favorites. Podcast experts (those of us who have been listening to them for years) have cautiously begun to suggest that we have entered the “Golden Age” of podcasting. Is this truly a golden age of podcasting, or simply a renaissance?

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the popularity of podcasting due to improving quality, popular podcasts like “Serial,” similar content intake forms like Netflix, and the ability to consume them on your own timeframe. They also examine the concept of “The Golden Age of Podcasting”; is this just a buzz phrase or are we really reaching a peak in podcast popularity? In a very flattering way, they suggest that their lawyer listeners try more Legal Talk Network podcasts and recommend ways of searching for new ones. They also encourage lawyers and other podcast enthusiasts to start their own! If you do, make sure you invest in high-quality equipment.

On behalf of listeners, Dennis graciously invested in an Apple Watch and has been wearing it for two weeks. In the second part of the podcast, he gives his early review and talks about notifications, health apps, the look and feel, parlor tricks, and the rudeness factor. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Lunch Hour Legal Marketing

The Summer of Lunch Part 2: Authentic Legal Marketing in the Digital Age

Because clients’ lives are increasingly online, lawyers need to market their law firms online too. When looking at a website, marketing campaigns, social media, or even bios, potential clients are interested in authentic online profiles and messages. But when lawyers try to balance professionalism with authenticity, it results in cliches, uninteresting self-promotion, and useless information. So with legal ethical restrictions, a raise in competition, and, let’s face it, not much extra time, how do we improve our marketing strategies?

This episode of Lunch Hour Legal Marketing features the second interview by Jared Correia during Mass LOMAP’s 5th Annual Marketing Conference in Boston. In a series titled Summer of Lunch, Jared interviews Ed Walters, CEO of Fastcase, about the ways lawyers can improve their online marketing by understanding what their clients want to see. Don’t forget, Ed explains, your (potential) clients are smart people who simply don’t know how to navigate their legal issues.

Topics include:

  • Marketing that focuses on empathy
  • Branding a niche practice versus specializing in everything
  • Direct and honest firm promotion
  • Highlighting benefits clients actually care about: parking, personality, experience
  • Interesting and informative bios
  • Adjusting approaches learned in law school
  • No more cliches!

Ed Walters is CEO of Fastcase, a legal research engine with over 800,000 subscribers. He was previously a practicing lawyer, advisor to the NFL, the NHL, and worked in the White House. Ed is also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University of Law Center where he teaches Law of Robots.

Tweet about this series using the hashtag #summeroflunch!

Paralegal Voice

Technology Competence for Paralegals and Lawyers

As paralegals (or any legal professional really), it is difficult to keep up with technology trends, firm software, or even client data security. Listeners of The Paralegal Voice are likely ahead of the curve in terms of legal tech education, even though technology evolves so quickly. But what about the lawyers in our firms? Attorneys are required by the American Bar Association to maintain a certain level of technology competence to comply with ethical standards, but we often notice that they aren’t caught up. How do we as paralegals assist our lawyers?

On this episode of The Paralegal Voice, Vicki Voisin interviews Sam Glover, lawyer and founder of Lawyerist.com, about why lawyers need to be competent with technology, why paralegals should teach lawyers how to use technology rather than accepting all IT responsibilities, and tricks to maintain your own tech knowledge.

Topics include:

  • Rules 1.6c and 1.1 from the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct
  • Examples of clients and cases lost due to technological incompetence
  • Attorneys, paralegals, and other firm staff using public wifi
  • E-discovery, communications from the court, data security issues
  • Encryption and using a VPN
  • Teaching lawyers rather than taking on IT responsibility
  • Rejecting the mentality of “it’s working so stick with it.”
  • The paralegal’s role in choosing cloud software
  • Sam’s favorite tech gadgets and apps
  • Tips for keeping up with technology
  • Practice tip from Vicki: 4 biggest time wasters

Sam Glover is a lawyer and founder of the online magazine Lawyerist.com, home to the largest community of solo and small firm lawyers on the web. He has written and spoken extensively about legal technology, marketing, management, and ethics, among other topics.

Special thanks to our sponsors, Boston UniversityNALA, and ServeNow.

Legal Toolkit

Mobile Apps for Legal Services: Competition or Advantage?

Software developers and progressive law firms are looking for ways to streamline their practices, offer higher quality services for less, and help bridge access to justice. Using mobile apps and other technologies, basic legal services are increasingly available, affordable, and easy to use. But many attorneys are wary of technology like LegalZoom and Shake because they think it poses competition to and might even replace solo and small firms. So how can these solo and small firm lawyers modify their practices to compete in the changing legal market?

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Heidi Alexander interviews two people who are on the technology side of offering legal services. Abe Geiger, the founder and CEO of Shake, and Bill Palin, an attorney and app developer, discuss why they decided to create the legal technology tools, how solo and small firms might use these tools to gain a competitive advantage, and which non-legal mobile apps lawyers can use to increase efficiency in their practice. Don’t know where to start? Abe, Bill, and Heidi finish the podcast with app suggestions, how to catch up on tech trends, and predictions for the future of legal services.

Abe Geiger founded Shake, a platform that allows users to create, sign, and send legally binding agreements from their smartphones. He started his career with early-stage tech startups in New York and San Francisco, and has his MBA from Columbia.

Bill Palin is an attorney and developer in Massachusetts. He won the American Bar Association’s Access to Justice Appathon competition with his app, Paper Health, which is a simple health care proxy and living will generator. He has also recently developed RedactoR, a redaction app for attorneys. Bill teaches courses at MIT and Suffolk Law School.

The Digital Edge

How Lawyers Can Do More in Less Time

Many lawyers work far more than 40 hours a week and still lack the time to work on firm marketing, practice management, and spending time with friends and family. Furthermore, with increases in technology, it seems as though lawyers should be more efficient, but this isn’t always the case. What are we doing wrong and what strategies can lawyers and other professionals use to increase productivity and free up more time?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Allison Shields, co-author of “How to Do More in Less Time: The Complete Guide to Improving Your Productivity and Increasing Your Bottom Line.” Allison discusses why she wrote the book, productivity mistakes lawyers often make, and specific suggestions she has for increasing time efficiency.

Topics include:

  • Pressure among other lawyers to overwork
  • How technology has affected client expectations
  • Setting goals for overall firm success
  • The mistake of trying to multi-task
  • Clear steps to overcome the fear of delegation
  • Effective calendar use
  • Using technology properly
  • How lawyers and professionals should approach Allison’s book

Allison Shields is the president of Legal Ease Consulting, Inc., which provides marketing, practice management, and productivity coaching and consulting services for lawyers and law firms nationwide. She is also the executive director of the Suffolk Academy of Law, the educational arm of the Suffolk County Bar Association. She is a frequent lecturer and writes for numerous legal publications including the regular Simple Steps column for Law Practice Magazine.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Digital Detectives

E-Discovery Reflections from Retired Magistrate Judge John Facciola

John M. Facciola is a retired United States Magistrate Judge who formerly served in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He has authored over 700 opinions, many of them in e-discovery and in the impact of information technology upon Fourth Amendment principles. With an inside knowledge of how e-discovery directly affects lawyers and cases, he is highly qualified to discuss the significant technological shift occurring in the world of law.

On this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Facciola about why lawyers need to learn about e-discovery now, how we can integrate e-discovery training into law schools and ongoing legal education, and the importance of law firms investing in professional development and creativity.

Topics Include:

  • Embracing the future of legal technology to avoid falling behind
  • Clinicians, physicians, coders, and health records
  • Craig Ball and the the Electronic Discovery Training Academy
  • Discrete e-discovery courses, topic integration, or a bootcamp
  • Using wit and humor as a judge
  • Keeping up with the people you represent culturally and technologically
  • Creative financial models and being proactive in litigation
  • Cooperation and transparency in e-discovery

Judge John Facciola is a member of the Sedona Conference Advisory Board and has received the Sedona Conference’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law where he teaches Information Technology, Modern Litigation, and a course in Evidence.

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