Podcast category: Legal Technology

Kennedy-Mighell Report

Is This the Golden Age of Podcasting?

In the last couple of years, the number of great podcasts has exploded. Many people today not only know the word “podcast,” but can give you several examples of their favorites. Podcast experts (those of us who have been listening to them for years) have cautiously begun to suggest that we have entered the “Golden Age” of podcasting. Is this truly a golden age of podcasting, or simply a renaissance.

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss the popularity of podcasting due to improving quality, popular podcasts like “Serial,” similar content intake forms like Netflix, and the ability to consume them on your own timeframe. They also examine the concept of “The Golden Age of Podcasting”; is this just a buzz phrase or are we really reaching a peak in podcast popularity? In a very flattering way, they suggest that their lawyer listeners try more Legal Talk Network podcasts and recommend ways of searching for new ones. They also encourage lawyers and other podcast enthusiasts to start their own! If you do, make sure you invest in high-quality equipment.

On behalf of listeners, Dennis graciously invested in an Apple Watch and has been wearing it for two weeks. In the second part of the podcast, he gives his early review and talks about notifications, health apps, the look and feel, parlor tricks, and the rudeness factor. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

Lunch Hour Legal Marketing

The Summer of Lunch Part 2: Authentic Legal Marketing in the Digital Age

Because clients’ lives are increasingly online, lawyers need to market their law firms online too. When looking at a website, marketing campaigns, social media, or even bios, potential clients are interested in authentic online profiles and messages. But when lawyers try to balance professionalism with authenticity, it results in cliches, uninteresting self-promotion, and useless information. So with legal ethical restrictions, a raise in competition, and, let’s face it, not much extra time, how do we improve our marketing strategies?

This episode of Lunch Hour Legal Marketing features the second interview by Jared Correia during Mass LOMAP’s 5th Annual Marketing Conference in Boston. In a series titled Summer of Lunch, Jared interviews Ed Walters, CEO of Fastcase, about the ways lawyers can improve their online marketing by understanding what their clients want to see. Don’t forget, Ed explains, your (potential) clients are smart people who simply don’t know how to navigate their legal issues.

Topics include:

  • Marketing that focuses on empathy
  • Branding a niche practice versus specializing in everything
  • Direct and honest firm promotion
  • Highlighting benefits clients actually care about: parking, personality, experience
  • Interesting and informative bios
  • Adjusting approaches learned in law school
  • No more cliches!

Ed Walters is CEO of Fastcase, a legal research engine with over 800,000 subscribers. He was previously a practicing lawyer, advisor to the NFL, the NHL, and worked in the White House. Ed is also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University of Law Center where he teaches Law of Robots.

Tweet about this series using the hashtag #summeroflunch!

Paralegal Voice

Technology Competence for Paralegals and Lawyers

As paralegals (or any legal professional really), it is difficult to keep up with technology trends, firm software, or even client data security. Listeners of The Paralegal Voice are likely ahead of the curve in terms of legal tech education, even though technology evolves so quickly. But what about the lawyers in our firms? Attorneys are required by the American Bar Association to maintain a certain level of technology competence to comply with ethical standards, but we often notice that they aren’t caught up. How do we as paralegals assist our lawyers?

On this episode of The Paralegal Voice, Vicki Voisin interviews Sam Glover, lawyer and founder of Lawyerist.com, about why lawyers need to be competent with technology, why paralegals should teach lawyers how to use technology rather than accepting all IT responsibilities, and tricks to maintain your own tech knowledge.

Topics include:

  • Rules 1.6c and 1.1 from the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct
  • Examples of clients and cases lost due to technological incompetence
  • Attorneys, paralegals, and other firm staff using public wifi
  • E-discovery, communications from the court, data security issues
  • Encryption and using a VPN
  • Teaching lawyers rather than taking on IT responsibility
  • Rejecting the mentality of “it’s working so stick with it.”
  • The paralegal’s role in choosing cloud software
  • Sam’s favorite tech gadgets and apps
  • Tips for keeping up with technology
  • Practice tip from Vicki: 4 biggest time wasters

Sam Glover is a lawyer and founder of the online magazine Lawyerist.com, home to the largest community of solo and small firm lawyers on the web. He has written and spoken extensively about legal technology, marketing, management, and ethics, among other topics.

Special thanks to our sponsors, Boston UniversityNALA, and ServeNow.

Legal Toolkit

Mobile Apps for Legal Services: Competition or Advantage?

Software developers and progressive law firms are looking for ways to streamline their practices, offer higher quality services for less, and help bridge access to justice. Using mobile apps and other technologies, basic legal services are increasingly available, affordable, and easy to use. But many attorneys are wary of technology like LegalZoom and Shake because they think it poses competition to and might even replace solo and small firms. So how can these solo and small firm lawyers modify their practices to compete in the changing legal market?

In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, Heidi Alexander interviews two people who are on the technology side of offering legal services. Abe Geiger, the founder and CEO of Shake, and Bill Palin, an attorney and app developer, discuss why they decided to create the legal technology tools, how solo and small firms might use these tools to gain a competitive advantage, and which non-legal mobile apps lawyers can use to increase efficiency in their practice. Don’t know where to start? Abe, Bill, and Heidi finish the podcast with app suggestions, how to catch up on tech trends, and predictions for the future of legal services.

Abe Geiger founded Shake, a platform that allows users to create, sign, and send legally binding agreements from their smartphones. He started his career with early-stage tech startups in New York and San Francisco, and has his MBA from Columbia.

Bill Palin is an attorney and developer in Massachusetts. He won the American Bar Association’s Access to Justice Appathon competition with his app, Paper Health, which is a simple health care proxy and living will generator. He has also recently developed RedactoR, a redaction app for attorneys. Bill teaches courses at MIT and Suffolk Law School.

The Digital Edge

How Lawyers Can Do More in Less Time

Many lawyers work far more than 40 hours a week and still lack the time to work on firm marketing, practice management, and spending time with friends and family. Furthermore, with increases in technology, it seems as though lawyers should be more efficient, but this isn’t always the case. What are we doing wrong and what strategies can lawyers and other professionals use to increase productivity and free up more time?

In this episode of The Digital Edge, Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Allison Shields, co-author of “How to Do More in Less Time: The Complete Guide to Improving Your Productivity and Increasing Your Bottom Line.” Allison discusses why she wrote the book, productivity mistakes lawyers often make, and specific suggestions she has for increasing time efficiency.

Topics include:

  • Pressure among other lawyers to overwork
  • How technology has affected client expectations
  • Setting goals for overall firm success
  • The mistake of trying to multi-task
  • Clear steps to overcome the fear of delegation
  • Effective calendar use
  • Using technology properly
  • How lawyers and professionals should approach Allison’s book

Allison Shields is the president of Legal Ease Consulting, Inc., which provides marketing, practice management, and productivity coaching and consulting services for lawyers and law firms nationwide. She is also the executive director of the Suffolk Academy of Law, the educational arm of the Suffolk County Bar Association. She is a frequent lecturer and writes for numerous legal publications including the regular Simple Steps column for Law Practice Magazine.

Digital Detectives

E-Discovery Reflections from Retired Magistrate Judge John Facciola

John M. Facciola is a retired United States Magistrate Judge who formerly served in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He has authored over 700 opinions, many of them in e-discovery and in the impact of information technology upon Fourth Amendment principles. With an inside knowledge of how e-discovery directly affects lawyers and cases, he is highly qualified to discuss the significant technological shift occurring in the world of law.

On this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Facciola about why lawyers need to learn about e-discovery now, how we can integrate e-discovery training into law schools and ongoing legal education, and the importance of law firms investing in professional development and creativity.

Topics Include:

  • Embracing the future of legal technology to avoid falling behind
  • Clinicians, physicians, coders, and health records
  • Craig Ball and the the Electronic Discovery Training Academy
  • Discrete e-discovery courses, topic integration, or a bootcamp
  • Using wit and humor as a judge
  • Keeping up with the people you represent culturally and technologically
  • Creative financial models and being proactive in litigation
  • Cooperation and transparency in e-discovery

Judge John Facciola is a member of the Sedona Conference Advisory Board and has received the Sedona Conference’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law where he teaches Information Technology, Modern Litigation, and a course in Evidence.

The Florida Bar Podcast

Florida Bar President Ray Abadin on Lawyers and Technology

The 2015 Annual Voluntary Bar Leaders Conference recently took place in Manalapan, Florida. During the event, Adriana Linares and co-host Renee Thompson sat down with the new Florida Bar President, Ray Abadin, to discuss the highlights of his presentation and his passions for the future of Florida lawyers.

On this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast, Linares, Thompson, and Abadin discuss:

  • Accepting non-lawyer service providers into the legal marketplace
  • Providing cheaper, more accessible, and efficient services
  • Using Legalzoom, Avvo, and Rocket Matter alongside your practice
  • The commodity of trust in this world of online reviews
  • How to have a global practice
  • What to do about the 60% of people who have unmet legal service needs
  • Florida lawyers and the fear of reciprocity
  • Ethics and a consistent demand for high quality standards
  • A side note about President Abadin appointing women to leadership roles

Ramón A. Abadin is a partner in the Miami office of Sedgwick LLP, where he focuses on complex commercial, insurance, and corporate litigation. His focus as Bar president is on technology and challenging the Bar’s membership and leadership to recognize the transformation revolutionizing the legal services marketplace and to embrace that change. At the Bar Leaders Conference, his presentation described the revolution in the delivery of legal services, resulting opportunities for lawyers, and how Bars can inform and assist members in navigating the new landscape.

Special Reports

Electronic Discovery, Online Controlled Devices, and Legal Ethics

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews panelists of the incredibly important seminar titled “Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence: Pre Discovery Through Trial” at The Florida Bar’s 2015 Annual Conference. In the first part of the podcast, he talks with electronic discovery experts John Jorgensen and Steven Teppler about the presentation “The Internet of Things,” and devices controlled online by computer code. They examine issues of hearsay and authentication in cases where these devices malfunction in a harmful way. Explaining technological evidence to a jury or judge can often be the most difficult part of these cases.

In the second part of this podcast, Laurence interviews Christian Dodd and Larry Kunin about the merging of technology and legal ethics. They discuss The Florida Bar’s proposed increase in technology CLE requirements, client data stored on printer hard drives, supervising non-lawyer staff, and what is a reasonable level of competence. Most importantly, they emphasize that technology is growing exponentially. As lawyers, if we don’t have a basic understanding now, we are already falling behind.

John Jorgensen is chief executive officer and a founding partner of the Sylint Group, a computer forensics and cybersecurity firm that operates out of Sarasota, Florida.

Steven Teppler is a partner in the Abbott Law Group, a trial firm for catastrophic personal injury. Steven directs the firm’s electronic discovery and technology based litigation.

Christian Dodd does commercial litigation, class action defense, IP litigation, electronic discovery, and digital evidence for the Hickey Smith Firm. He’s based out of Jacksonville, Florida.

Larry Kunin is a partner at Morris Manning & Martin in Atlanta, and is chair of the data security practice. He specializes in commercial litigation and technology litigation.

Special Reports

Florida Bar’s ADR Section: The Benefits of Alternative Dispute Resolution

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews Bob Hoyle and Meah Tell from the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) section about their seminar titled “Arbitration, Effective Joint Opening Sessions, and Ethical Issues for Mediators and Attorneys” at The Florida Bar’s 2015 Annual Convention.

Podcast Topics Include:

  • New revised Florida arbitration code
  • Pitfalls attorneys fall into before and after mediation
  • Mandatory non-binding arbitration
  • How arbitration affects plaintiffs, attorneys, and courts
  • Cost saving factors of arbitration and mediation
  • Client Satisfaction

Meah Tell has been a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit civil and family court mediator since 1990. She is chair-elect of the ADR section of the Florida Bar and she formerly served as the president of the bar academy of professional mediators. She currently serves on the Florida Supreme Court Mediator Ethics and Advisory Committee.

Bob Hoyle practices in the Tampa Bay area and has been a certified mediator since 1999. He is the chair of the Florida ADR section, which is comprised of over 1,000 members who are attorneys that are either mediators or practice in the mediation area of the law.

Special Reports

Social Media: Expectations of Privacy and Administration of Justice

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews social media lawyer and consultant Ethan Wall at The Florida Bar’s 2015 Annual Conference. Together they discuss how social media has affected the law, including discovery and conflicts between what lawyers and their clients believe to be private and the reality of online privacy rights. Additionally, Ethan tackles the big issue of juries and judges being affected by the media in high profile cases, including his discussion with Judge Belvin Perry who presided over the Casey Anthony trial.

Ethan Wall is a social media lawyer, author, professor, and consultant. He helps attorneys use social media in their practices for marketing, ethics, and litigation training.

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