Podcast category: Legal Technology

Digital Detectives

Predictive Coding for Rookies: E-Discovery in the Courtroom

Discovery, as all lawyers know, is the process of collecting and exchanging information about the court case to prepare for the trial. Traditionally, this was done by many lawyers over countless billable hours in which every page of potential evidence was examined for important information. Because of this, the more information existed in reference to a case, the more expensive the case was. As technology developed, law firms began using computers to do keyword searches and conceptual searches. Unfortunately, there were problems including picking the right keywords or concepts, misspelled words, how to structure the items, and that these searches only yielded 20% of important data. Recently, technology has advanced to predictive coding, or teaching a computer program to think like a lawyer would. But how cost effective and practical is predictive coding, and how well does it actually work?

In this episode of The Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the evolution of technology and case discovery, how predictive coding works and is priced, and examples of cases that have involved predictive coding. Simek first explains the importance of culling, or filtering out unimportant data sets through DeNISTing, deduping, or filtering by dates. He then explains predictive coding in its simplicity: to feed a computer program information based on discovery attorneys have already done until the computer can accurately predict which information is important. Simek and Nelson then go on to examine the prices vendors charge for the predictive coding process and in which cases it might be profitable for the law firm or client. There is a steep, expensive learning curve involved; many mid-sized law firms probably will not profit and even very large cases only save an average of 15% using predictive coding. However, Nelson explains, predictive coding is the future of discovery, so it is important for lawyers to pay attention to when the benefits outweigh the costs.

Nelson concludes the podcast by giving examples of when predictive coding has already appeared in court cases. The landmark case was Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, in which Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck allowed predictive coding to be used as long as the defense and prosecution agree to its use, there are a large volume of documents, it is the superior technology, it is more cost effective, and it is transparent and defensible. Inevitably, the conclusion is that it is not for the judge to micromanage the discovery process.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Digital WarRoom.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

The College of Law Practice Management’s 2014 Futures Conference

The College of Law Practice Management recently held its 2014 Futures Conference at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. This conference brings together members of the College of Law Practice Management and young innovative lawyers to discuss what the future of law practice might look like and how the attendees might provide an influential voice.  Dennis and Tom participated in the program and came away with some interesting insights about the direction innovative lawyers are headed. They also have some feedback about what worked for the conference and what they might have changed.

In this episode of The Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell talk about the 2014 Futures Conference, the future of law practice, and the role technology is likely to play in that future. The conference, they explain, featured programming as well as an innovation discussion surrounding a “Ted Talks” then “Shark Tank” concept of quickly coming up with ideas and then collaborating to develop the best of them. Mighell noted the most common ideas involved providing services to underserved demographics who don’t have proper access to legal resources. He discusses the importance of narrowing and developing broad concepts and whether we should revisit old ideas in light of new technology. Kennedy wishes there had been more group time to develop ideas. He also discusses balancing programming and free time in the College of Law Practice Management’s Futures Conference and another he attended this year. Overall, both enjoyed the conference, and were please to see that Suffolk Law School is teaching legal technology, process improvement, project management so new lawyers can be “practice ready”.

After the break, Kennedy and Mighell discuss the new iPads that were released, the benefits of each, and the excitement (or lack of excitement) surrounding tablets. Kennedy tentatively decides on the iPad Air 2 with 64 gigabytes, Applecare, a smart cover, and the Apple wireless keyboard. Tom notes the thinness of the new iPads and the decreasing enthusiasm for buying new iPads. As always, stay tuned for Parting Shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

 

Gone Clio

Clio Cloud Conference: Bob Ambrogi Interviews Jack Newton, CEO of Clio

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Clio CEO Jack Newton at the Clio Cloud Conference in Chicago. They discuss the history of Clio as a company and the purpose of the Clio Cloud Conference, the attitude of lawyers towards practice management and cloud computing, and why there is such a low adoption rate. Newton explains current and future Clio features including integrations, mobile management apps, and the roll out of ClioNext, the newest iteration of the application. Jack Newton, co founder and CEO of Clio, launched the Clio Cloud Conference to bring legal professionals together to discuss thought leadership, the future of legal as a business, and where legal technology is going.

 

 

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Omar Ha-Redeye on Social Media Affecting Legal Cases

New Solo host Adriana Linares interviews Omar Ha-Redeye about his experience at the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. Ha-Redeye discusses being a Canadian lawyer, how social media can negatively affect legal cases through false evidence or jury tampering, and how he uses Clio differently within his company. Omar Ha-Redeye founded Fleet Street Law, an incubator that provides strategic support mentoring for young lawyers who want to build up their skill sets.

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Nicole Bradick on Agile Lawyering

New Solo host Adriana Linares interviews Nicole Bradick about trends for staffing in firms during the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. Bradick explains that more than half of law firms are using or thinking about using a contingent workforce in order to best meet their clients’ needs while still turning a profit. Nicole Bradick is the founder and CEO of Custom Counsel, a network of freelance attorneys who do project based work for law firms.

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Nerino Petro on Protecting Digital Assets

New Solo host Adriana Linares interviews Nerino Petro about his speech at the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. Petro discusses protecting digital assets, what can be learned from recent digital breaches, the diversity of security breaches over time, and why lawyers should be concerned. Nerino Petro was the Practice Management Advisor for the Wisconsin State Bar for eight years and recently became the Chief Information Officer for Holmstrom & Kennedy, P.C.

 

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Lawyer Technology Competence with Catherine Sanders Reach

At the Clio Cloud Conference, Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews legal technology expert Catherine Sanders Reach about technology awareness for lawyers. She explains that the ABA competence rule now expressly includes technology. Many attorneys have remained willfully ignorant of technologies such as e filing, e-discovery, and email security, but will need to change in order to stay in compliance with new regulations. Reach is the director of law practice management technology for the  Chicago Bar Association and was the director at the ABA’s Legal Technology Resource Center for over 10 years.

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Law Firm Ownership Deregulation with George Beaton

Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti interviews consultant George Beaton about how client buying behavior was affected by the deregulation of ownership of law firms in Australia. Beaton discusses conflicts of interest, access to justice, client satisfaction, and the range of services under an outside ownership model for a law firm. Additionally, he talks about professionalism in the legal field and the role of an oversight model such as a Bar Association. Dr. George Beaton is a partner in Beaton Capital, an associate professor at the University of Melbourne, and authored NewLaw New Rules, a ground-breaking narrative on the changes sweeping the legal services industry.

 

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Jabez LeBret on Digital Marketing for Law Firms

Legal Talk Network Producer Laurence Colletti interviews Jabez LeBret, one of the speakers at the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. LeBret gives insights into what lawyers need for an online presence without crossing ethical boundaries, how much time a small firm should invest in marketing, and being a thought leader within your product and field. It is important to have a good website and write information for clients, not other lawyers. Jabez LeBret is a business writer for Forbes, an international technology expert, co-author of the best-selling legal professional book Online Law Practice Strategies, and founder of the agency GNGF.

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Ernest Svenson (Ernie the Attorney) on Going Paperless

New Solo host Adriana Linares interviews Ernest Svenson about his speech and his experience at the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. Svenson explains how lawyers become more efficient when they go paperless and ways to start managing digital files without needing a consultant. Ernest Svenson founded PaperlessChase.com to help lawyers with practice management and runs his own paperless solo practice.

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