Podcast category: Legal News

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

The Ramifications of NSA Monitoring on Attorney-Client Privilege and the Bill of Rights

Attorney-Client Privilege predates US history and is a fixture of Western Law. Pro advocates of its proliferation declare its necessity to a fair and adequate defense. According to many legal experts, NSA monitoring of privileged attorney-client communications stands in direct violation to the United States Bill of Rights and yet others disagree. In this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams shed light on this issue with guests Dean Erwin Chemerinsky of the University of California, Irvine School of Law and Dr. John Eastman of Chapman University Fowler School of Law.

Erwin Chemerinsky is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at the University of California, Irvine School of Law. His areas of expertise include, but are not limited to, constitutional law, federal practice, and civil rights. Erwin is a renowned author of seven books and nearly 200 articles in top law reviews. He has argued before the nation’s highest courts and has been counsel to detainees in Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp in the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. He is also a regular commentator on legal issues before the national and local media.

Dr. John Eastman is the Henry Salvatori Professor of Law & Community Service at Chapman University Fowler School of Law. He was the School’s Dean from June 2007 to January 2010, when he stepped down to pursue a bid for California Attorney General. John is the Founding Director of the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence, former law clerk for Justice Clarence Thomas, and has served as the Director of Congressional & Public Affairs at the United States Commission on Civil Rights during the Reagan administration. He is also a regular commentator on legal issues before the national and local media.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Diploma Privilege: Why Some Believe Bar Exams Should be Eliminated

Are Bar Exams really necessary? The Iowa State Bar Association isn’t so sure. In this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Iowa State Bar Association President Guy Cook and Clinical Professor of Law John Whiston to learn why Iowa could soon offer Diploma Privilege for its law graduates.

Cook is the current president of the Iowa State Bar Association. He is an Iowa native who has been practicing law for over 30 years. Guy is a board certified trial attorney, former federal prosecutor, and senior partner for Grefe & Sidney, P.L.C. where he practices exclusively in litigation. He also serves on the Board of Counselors of Drake University Law School.

Whiston is a clinical professor of law at The University of Iowa College of Law. He teaches in the Clinical Legal Programs as well as courses in Evidence, Deposition Practice, Worker’s Compensation, and Trial Advocacy. John is a former partner with Rossbach & Whiston, P.C. and has been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Top Legal Stories of 2013

In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite Allen Pusey and Molly McDonough of the ABA Journal to recap the past year’s legal news. Consider this a crash course on news stories such as Edward Snowden, gun control, and Obamacare. The discussion will not only cover the top stories of the year but also find the common themes in this year’s news and foretell what to keep an eye on in 2014.

Pusey has been with the ABA Journal since 2007 and was named editor and publisher in 2011. Prior to the ABA Journal, he worked for 26 years at the Dallas Morning News as an investigative reporter, feature writer, special projects editor, and U.S. Supreme Court correspondent.

McDonough is the deputy managing editor of the ABA Journal. She currently oversees online operations and special projects, including the Legal Rebels series and the annual Blawg 100. Molly has covered the courts and the legal profession for more than 20 years. She has been a reporter and editor for the National Law Journal, as well as a reporter for many other news sources.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Is U.S. District Judge Scheindlin’s Removal a Question of Judges’ First Amendment Rights?

“It’s impossible to figure out exactly what the judge did wrong,” University of Pennsylvania Law Professor Kermit Roosevelt says, discussing Federal District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin’s removal from Floyd, et al. v. The City of New York, known as the “stop-and-frisk” case. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the Judge “ran afoul” of the Code of Conduct for United States Judges given her participation in media interviews and by making public statements about the “stop and frisk” case. The 2nd Circuit’s ruling did not provide further detail or examples. In this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, your host J. Craig Williams invites Roosevelt to discuss Scheindlin’s removal, whether this action is a question of judge’s first amendment rights, and the possible outcomes of her appeal.

Roosevelt is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Working in a diverse range of fields, he focuses in constitutional law and conflict law. Professor Roosevelt was recently a part of a New York Times Room for Debate, discussing Scheindlin’s removal and what restrictions should be placed on judges. He has also served as a law clerk to Supreme Court Associate Justice David H. Souter and D.C. Circuit Court Judge Stephen F. Williams.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

What to Expect for the 2013-2014 Supreme Court Term

 

We saw a number of high-profile cases in the last Supreme Court term. With the nation currently alert to gay rights and Obamacare, some say this new term has fallen under the radar. But take note – as the spotlight shifts to campaign finance laws, free speech, and the president’s power to make recess appointments – the upcoming docket could have some monumental decisions in store. On this edition of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams invite the editor of the SCOTUSblog Amy Howe and LA Times Supreme Court correspondent David Savage to discuss the new term.

Amy Howe has been with SCOTUSblog since 2003. She has served as counsel in over two dozen merits cases at the Supreme Court and has argued two cases there. Howe has also co-taught Supreme Court litigation courses at Stanford and Harvard law schools.

David Savage has been covering the court for nearly three decades. In addition to his work with the LA Times, he also writes a monthly column for the ABA Journal and is regularly featured on NPR’s Talk of the Nation. In 1992 he published Turning Right: The Making of the Rehnquist Supreme Court, outlining the efforts of the Reagan and first Bush administrations to remake the high court.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

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