Podcast category: Legal News

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Greece v. Galloway: Prayer in Government Assemblies

On May 5th 2014, the Supreme Court decided Greece v. Galloway, a landmark case about the right of prayer in government assemblies. Both sides of the argument invoked the First Amendment to make their case, but who is right and why? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, host Bob Ambrogi brings this issue to the forefront with opposing counsels Douglas Laycock, for the respondents, and David Cortman, for the petitioner. Together, they discuss the relative merits of their cases, the endorsement test, and the coercion test. Tune in to hear more about the future of legislative prayer and your First Amendment rights.

Professor Douglas Laycock is a Robert E. Scott Distinguished Professor of Law Professor of Religious Studies at University of Virginia School of Law and one of the nation’s leading authorities on the law of religious liberty. In addition to teaching for over 30 years, Professor Laycock has testified frequently before Congress and has argued many cases in the courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Laycock is an accomplished author on the subject at hand and the 2nd Vice President of the American Law Institute. Especially pertinent to today’s episode, Professor Laycock argued for Susan Galloway and Linda Stephens, the respondents, in the Supreme Court.

David Cortman serves as senior counsel and vice-president of Religious Liberty with Alliance Defending Freedom at its Atlanta Regional Service Center in Georgia. He also heads litigation efforts to defend and reclaim the First Amendment rights of public school students across the country. Among his many media appearances, Mr. Cortman has been on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News. Especially pertinent to today’s episode, he served as counsel for the Town of Greece, the petitioner, in the Supreme Court.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Workers Comp Matters

Employer Fraud and Recommendations from New York State Supreme Court’s Grand Jury Report

A recent Grand Jury Report from the New York State Supreme Court brought recommendations of change to handle Employer Fraud in Workers’ Compensation. Among the recommended areas of change are the application process, criminal statutes, and the method of collecting data. On this episode of Workers Comp Matters, host Alan Pierce interviews Gilda Mariani of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. Together they discuss the results of the Grand Jury Report and the subsequent victims of premium fraud. Tune in to learn more about employee classifications, the involuntary insurance market, and drivers of cost for workers’ compensation insurance.

Gilda Mariani is with the New York County District Attorney’s Office, having held supervisory positions including Deputy Chief of its former Frauds Bureau as well as Chief of its former Money Laundering and Tax Crimes Unit. She has had a significant role in drafting legislation, including the New York Money Laundering Statute and the misdemeanor crime of Providing a Juror with a Gratuity. She has conducted several investigations that have led to issuance of Reports by the New York County Grand Jury, including the Grand Jury Report released in March 2014  on workers’ compensation reform. Mariani is also a recipient of the Robert M. Morgenthau Award by the District Attorneys Association of the State of New York.

Special thanks to our sponsor, PInow.

Ringler Radio

Litigation Involving Actos, Transvaginal Mesh and Zohydro

 

A jury determined that drug makers hid cancer risks associated with the diabetes medicine, Actos, from the public. Complications stemming from transvaginal mesh and lawsuits by women against the manufacturers is another case of how a defective product can have a huge impact on a life. Zohydro, a controversial painkiller is making waves when it comes to prescription drug abuse. On this Ringler Radio podcast, host Larry Cohen joins Andy Birchfield and Leigh O’Dell from the Beasley Allen Law Firm, as they spotlight litigation in these cases, causing a stir across the States.

Visit Ringler Associates to contact a consultant in your area about structured settlements.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Bryan Garner on the Latest Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary

Due out this week is the 10th edition of Black’s Law Dictionary. With 16,000 new definitions, 900 new maxims, and terms dated back to their first English usage, Black’s Law Dictionary 10th Edition is touted to be the most comprehensive and relevant collection of legal terminology to date. But what goes into making this legal reference and how does it stay relevant in today’s world? On this episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Black’s Law Dictionary’s editor-in-chief Professor Bryan A. Garner. Together they discuss the army of 300 professionals and scholars who deciphered true meanings from historic documents, ancient language, and modern usage. Tune in to hear Garner describe what goes into updating Black’s and why he believes attorneys will continue to use it for generations to come.

Bryan A. Garner is a U.S. lawyer, lexicographer, and teacher who has written several books about English usage and style, including Garner’s Modern American Usage and Elements of Legal Style. He has served as editor-in-chief of Black’s Law Dictionary since 1995, and coauthored two books with Justice Antonin Scalia: Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges, and Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts. Professor Garner is a prolific lecturer, having taught more than 2,500 writing workshops since the 1991 founding of his company, LawProse, Inc., and he is a distinguished Research Professor of Law at Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Ringler Radio

Litigation Surrounding General Motors Ignition Switch Problem

 

General Motors (GM) faces litigation stemming from an ignition switch problem in some recalled vehicles and now, families of the deceased or injured are seeking justice. On this Ringler Radio podcast, host Larry Cohen and co-host Mike Casey from Ringler Associates talk with Attorney Adam J. Levitt, director at Grant & Eisenhofer P.A. about the GM litigation, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s role and ultimately what this ignition problem means for the car giant.

Visit Ringler Associates to contact a consultant in your area about structured settlements.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Gideon’s Promise: Do Low Pay and Heavy Workloads Undermine the Right to Counsel?

In its landmark 1963 decision Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court mandated the right to counsel in federal and state criminal proceedings. Fifty-one years after that unanimous decision, some question whether Gideon’s promise has been fulfilled, as public defenders struggle against heavy caseloads, limited resources and low pay. On this episode of Lawyer2Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Jonathan Rapping, founder of the Atlanta-based public defender training program Gideon’s Promise, and Dawn Porter, director and producer of the documentary Gideon’s Army. Together they discuss the daily rigors faced by public defenders in the south, their personal beliefs about unequal access to justice, and their ideas about how to better deliver on the promise of Gideon.

Jonathan Rapping is the president and founder of Gideon’s Promise, a training and support group for public defenders in the south aimed at creating greater access to justice for indigent defendants. He is also the director of the Honors Program in Criminal Justice at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School, where he teaches criminal law and criminal procedure. Rapping is the former director of public defender training programs in the District of Columbia, Georgia, and Louisiana. He is the recipient of the Lincoln Leadership Award from Kentucky’s Department of Public Advocacy, the Sentencing Project Award from the National Association of Sentencing Advocates and Mitigation Specialists, and the Gideon’s Promise Award from the Southern Center for Human Rights.

Dawn Porter is a lawyer and the founder of Trilogy Films. She was the director and producer of the award-winning Gideon’s Army, a documentary about public defenders associated with Gideon’s Promise, which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and aired on HBO Documentary Films. Prior to beginning her film and television career, Porter worked as an attorney at Baker & Hostetler and ABC Television Network. Among her many projects, she directed “Spies of Mississippi,” a documentary on PBS about celebrity Chef Alexandra Guarnaschelli; produced “Serious Moonlight” starring Meg Ryan and Timothy Hutton; and produced “The Green,” an independent feature starring Cheyenne Jackson (from 30 Rock) and Emmy-winning actress Julia Ormond.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Ringler Radio

Medical Marijuana and Defending Workers’ Compensation Claims

 

In recent years, medical marijuana has become a controversial topic. So what happens as medical marijuana use becomes legal? How will it impact your workforce? On this Ringler Radio podcast, host Larry Cohen welcomes Attorney Richard W. Lenkov from the firm, Bryce Downey & Lenkov, to talk about medical marijuana within the workforce, defending workers’ compensation claims and his legal perspective from within the workers’ compensation arena.

Visit Ringler Associates to contact a consultant in your area about structured settlements.

Paralegal Voice

Paralegals: What If Your Client Claims Innocence?

Despite US notions of innocence until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, many innocent people have been sent to prison for lengthy to life sentences. Common reasons for these wrongful convictions are faulty eyewitness accounts, use of “junk” science as evidence, and informants with conflicts of interest. On this episode of The Paralegal Voice, host Vicki Voisin interviews Professor Marla Mitchell-Cichon from the Cooley Innocence Project at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School. Together they discuss the Innocence Project and the Post Conviction DNA Testing Statutes that opened the door for exoneration of the innocent around the country. Furthermore, we discover how the convicted innocent have less help than guilty parolees upon their release. Tune in to learn more about coerced confessions, bad actors who cause false convictions, and what remedies the wrongfully convicted have.

Professor Marla Mitchell-Cichon began her teaching career in 1986, following service as a public defender. Her clinical teaching includes post-conviction, criminal defense, general civil practice, elder law and externship. Professor Mitchell began teaching in Cooley’s Innocence Project in 2002. She serves as the project’s co-director. In 2006, Professor Mitchell received the Justice For All award from the Criminal Defense Attorneys of Michigan for her Innocence Project work. Professor Mitchell’s litigation experience includes practicing before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, the Ohio Supreme Court, and trial and appellate courts in Ohio and Michigan. Professor Mitchell’s publications are in the areas of criminal law, elder law, ethics, and clinical teaching.

Special thanks to our sponsors, NALA and ServeNow.

Kennedy-Mighell Report

ABA TECHSHOW 2014 Wrapup

Tom and Dennis recently attended ABA TECHSHOW 2014, one of the premier annual legal technology conferences. While there, they observed many interesting trends, saw innovative products, and met with numerous industry professionals. On this episode of the Kennedy-Mighell Report, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell discuss TECHSHOW highlights, what interested them most, and their reflections on the current state of legal technology. Tune in to learn more about the How-To sessions, Legal Technology Solutions Lab, and Speakers.

Special thanks to our sponsor, ServeNow.

 

 

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Revenge Porn: Criminal Legislation vs. Rights and Freedoms

Six states have passed laws to address revenge porn, but critics say those laws may infringe upon First Amendment rights and subject people to needless criminal prosecution. Critics of anti-revenge porn laws believe the laws as drafted are overly broad, fail to exempt acceptable behavior, and create a chilling effect on otherwise legal expression. On this follow up episode of Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams interview Lee Rowland from the ACLU and Marc Randazza from the Randazza Legal Group. Together we discuss the potentially harmful components of non-consensual porn legislation and consider alternative avenues of redress for victims. Professor Mary Anne Franks of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a proponent of criminalizing revenge porn, joins us for the second half to debate criticisms of these laws. Tune in for a spirited debate about free speech, over-criminalization, and the proper way to address the troubling issue of revenge porn.

For part one of this two-part series, please listen to Revenge Porn: Societal Costs and Legislative Solutions.

Lee Rowland is a Staff Attorney with the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project. Prior to joining the ACLU, she was a voting rights counsel with the Brennan Center for Justice, where she successfully represented the League of Women Voters of Florida and others in constitutional challenges to Florida’s 2011 election law. Rowland previously ran the Reno office of the ACLU of Nevada, where she regularly argued before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Nevada Supreme Court.

Marc Randazza is a First Amendment lawyer for the Randazza Legal Group located in Las Vegas, Nevada. A graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, he found his passion for the First Amendment while attending the University of Massachusetts at Amherst Journalism Program. Randazza has law offices in five states and represents both adult entertainment companies and private individuals. He is a regular contributor to news sources such as CNN and Fox News, and is a frequent commentator on legal issues to the international media.

Professor Mary Anne Franks is the Vice President of Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law. She holds a Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School and prior to her teaching career, obtained both her Masters and Ph.D. in Modern Languages and Literature as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. As part of her continuing efforts with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, she works with state legislatures to draft legislation against non-consensual pornography.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

Page 2 of 3123