Podcast category: Law School

ABA Law Student Podcast

Applying Restorative Justice Concepts to Capital Cases

When it comes to a capital case, prosecuting or defending an individual whose life rests on the verdict can be a personal struggle. How does a lawyer cope with the loss of a client and what restorative justice options can they seek in lieu of the death penalty?

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Fabiani Duarte and guest host Linsey Addington speak with Professor Sarah Gerwig Moore and Dr. Melissa Browning about the death penalty and ways restorative justice concepts can be used in capital cases. Sarah and Melissa begin by listing a few concepts and common misconceptions, such as the cost to the taxpayer for executing an inmate, that they believe should be considered when approaching the death penalty debate. Dr. Browning then goes into detail about how she learned about the Kelly Gissendaner case and what inspired her to get involved in seeking parole for Gissendaner. Professor Moore also gives some insight into her experience of being lead counsel seeking clemency for a death row inmate named Josh Bishop and explains the type of relationships lawyers can develop with these clients. The group then considers processes within the criminal justice system where restorative justice concepts can be applied and how these concepts, like seeking life without the possibility of parole, can reduce death row executions and promote communal well being.

Professor Sarah Gerwig-Moore‘s teaching and scholarship interests center around constitutional criminal law, appellate and post-conviction practice and procedure, and experiential public service learning. Since joining the Mercer faculty in 2006, she has created and now teaches the Habeas Project, the only pro bono effort in Georgia to offer representation in non-capital post-conviction cases. She received her BA, summa cum laude, from Mercer University, her Master of Theological Studies from Emory University’s Candler School of Theology, and her JD from Emory University School of Law.

Dr. Melissa Browning is the Visiting Assistant Professor of Contextual Ministry at Mercer University. Dr. Browning is a community-based participatory action researcher and Christian ethicist. Browning’s recent academic work has focused on ethnographic research in East Africa. Browning is also an anti-death penalty activist and the organizer of the Kelly on My Mind Collective. Dr. Browning received her Ph.D. in Christian Ethics from Loyola University Chicago (2011). She also holds an M.Div. in Global Missions from George W. Truett Theological Seminary at Baylor University (2002) and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Gardner-Webb University (1999).

ABA Law Student Podcast

Marcia Clark on “The People vs. O.J. Simpson,” Sexism, and Her Latest Book

Marcia Clark is best known for being the lead prosecutor for the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The former Heisman Trophy Winner was accused and found not guilty of the June 1994 death of Nicole Brown Simpson and waiter Ronald Lyle Goldman in a trial that captivated the country. Thrust back into the spotlight by “The People vs. O.J. Simpson” miniseries, a new generation is now fascinated by Clark, the discrimination she faced during the trial, and the writing career that followed.

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, hosts Fabiani Duarte and Sandy Gallant-Jones sit down with Marcia Clark, most notably known for serving as the prosecutor for the trial of O.J. Simpson, to discuss her new novel “Blood Defense.” Marcia provides deeper insight into the motivation behind the creation of, and the personality differences between, her long running character Rachel Knight and her new protagonist, Samantha Brinkman. She also speaks briefly about her experience writing through the prosecutorial lens and the catalyst behind her recent shift towards writing from the perspective of the defense. The focus of the discussion then pivots toward an analysis of her experiences during the O.J. Simpson case and her prosecutorial experience. Marcia reflects on the adversity she faced during the trial as she balanced raising a family, fighting a custody battle, and the sexism she experienced in the courtroom and the office. She closes the interview with advice on helpful skills that law students can develop while in school, such as discipline and persistence, and how those experiences can be applied to their work in the profession.

Marcia Clark has been a practicing criminal attorney since 1979 and served as prosecutor in the Los Angeles DA’s office for 10 years. There, she served as a prosecutor for the trials of Robert Bardo, convicted of killing actress Rebecca Schaeffer, and, most notably, O.J. Simpson, tried for the murders of his ex-wife Nicole and Ron Goldman. Marcia wrote a New York Times best-selling book on the Simpson case titled “Without a Doubt” which was re-released as an e-book, coinciding with the debut of the hit FX series “American Crime Story: The People vs. O.J. Simpson.” For nearly a decade, Clark has been a prolific novelist authoring four legal thrillers featuring Rachel Knight, a driven and gritty city prosecutor. On May 1st, Clark flips to writing from the perspective of a defense attorney in the launching of her fifth novel “Blood Defense,” the first in a new series featuring an ambitious and hard-charging Los Angeles criminal defense attorney named Samantha Brinkman. Marcia is a California native and received her J.D. from Southwestern University School of Law.

ABA Law Student Podcast

Law School and Depression

20% of lawyers suffer from depression, more than double that of the general population. Beyond that, 60,000 law students suffer from depression by the end of their second year. What resources are available for lawyers who find themselves battling the rigors of the profession and the struggles of depression?

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, hosts Fabiani Duarte and Madison Burke sit down with trial lawyer and founder of the website “Lawyers with Depression” Daniel Lukasik to discuss depression in the legal profession. Daniel opens the show by sharing some of his personal experiences battling depression, his path to treatment, and how that led to the creation of his website. He then takes a moment to analyze the number of law students and lawyers who suffer from depression and why those statistics are much higher than the average population. During this investigation Daniel also shares signs that law students can look for to determine if they are suffering from depression and some of the ways that depression might manifest itself in one’s life. The group then shifts focus to Daniel’s documentary “A Terrible Melancholy: Depression in the Legal Profession” and discuss resources supporters and those battling depression can seek to aid in treatment.

Daniel Lukasik is a trial lawyer with Maxwell Murphy LLP and the founder of the website “Lawyers with Depression.” He was also the executive producer for the documentary “A Terrible Melancholy: Depression in the Legal Profession.” Daniel graduated Magna Cum Laude from Buffalo State College and received his Juris Doctor from State University of New York at Buffalo Law School.

ABA Law Student Podcast

How to Land the Right Summer Associates Program

Many law students, upon graduating, find it very difficult to acquire employment in the legal profession straight out of school. Numerous law firms are unwilling to hire recent grads that have no previous work experience listed on their resumes. What should a recent graduate do to help increase their chances of finding a firm that is the right fit for them while providing the work experience necessary to land your first job?

In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast hosts Fabiani Duarte and Madison Burke sit down with Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section Chair-Elect John Cartafalsa to discuss the summer associates program. John opens the episode with a little explanation of his educational history and peers back into his law school days to offer some advice to his younger law student self. He then chats specifically about his firm’s participation in hiring summer associates and what he looks for in a candidate, while Fabiani and Madison both inquire about the best tactics for law students to land these positions. The conversations wraps with some focused advice directed towards students seeking to find a law firm that is the perfect fit for them.

John Cartafalsa is the chair-elect of the Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section for the American Bar Association. John is a managing attorney at Zurich Staff Legal Services and received his bachelor of science degree from American University School of International Service. He received his Juris Doctor from Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center.

ABA Law Student Podcast

ABA Law Student Division Board of Governors : Year in Review

The ABA Law Student Division serves to not only provide options for students to better engage with their peers but also to provide valuable leadership and career development opportunities. Individuals who wish to promote positive change within the profession will often seek to aid their peers by serving on the Law Student Division Board of Governors. In this ABA Law Student Podcast hosts Fabiani Duarte and Madison Burke sit down with members of the ABA Law Student Division to chat about their past year in review. The conversation opens with each board member explaining a bit about their law school background, the circuit they represent, and some of the changes their circuit went through over the year. The group then takes some time to discuss their favorite achievement that their respective law school was able to accomplish this year. The conversation wraps up with each governor providing tips and advice for the new board members that will be filling their positions once they leave.

Mathew C. Mecoli, Third Circuit
Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law

Akemini Ruby Isang, Fourth Circuit:
University of South Carolina School of Law

Marcus Sandifer, Fifth Circuit
Emory University School of Law

Krystal Yalldo, Sixth Circuit
Western Michigan University
Thomas M. Cooley Law School

Mayra Salinas-Menjivar, Fourteenth Circuit
University of Nevada Las Vegas,
William S. Boyd School of Law

Kirk W. Kabala, Fifteenth Circuit
Arizona Summit Law School

Andrew Rhoden, M.S.
American University, Washington College of Law
Washington, DC
Delegate to the ABA House of Delegates

ABA Law Student Podcast

Seeding Success: Cultivating YLD Opportunities with Bryan Rogers

The Law Student Division of the ABA provides many young lawyers with invaluable resources, benefits, and leadership opportunities. However, many students who are interested in pursuing a deeper level of engagement in the ABA aren’t sure how to continue their involvement as they enter the legal market. In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Fabiani Duarte chats with guest Bryan Rogers about the Young Lawyers Division and the Emerging Leaders Program that is helping law graduates seek significant leadership roles within the ABA.

Bryan Rogers is an associate attorney with the law firm Swanson, Martin & Bell, LLP. He also served as the Law Student Division representative to the ABA Board of Governors-Elect and as a 7th Circuit Governor. Bryan then moved on to be the Law Student Division representative member of the ABA Board of Governors. He also was a member of the inaugural class of the ABA Young Lawyers Division Emerging Leaders program. Bryan graduated from Valparaiso University School of Law (J.D., magna cum laude, 2013) and was the recipient of the ABA Law Student Division’s Golden Key Award.

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2016: Increasing Judicial Diversity Through Clerkship

Digital Detectives hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek sit down with State Trial Court Judge Heather Welch and United States Magistrate Judge for the District of Minnesota Leo Brisbois in this Special Report to discuss the 2016 Judicial Clerkship Program. The goal of this program is to increase diversity in law clerk positions at court levels all across the country. Both guests go into detail as to why increasing diversity in the judiciary is so important and why starting at the clerkship level is critical. The focus then shifts onto the state, federal, trial, appellate, and international judges who volunteer their time and resources to help mentor young lawyers through this program. Finally, the group explores the benefits and opportunities that the Judicial Clerkship Program offers young lawyers as they seek job prospects after graduation.

Leo Brisbois is the United States magistrate judge for the District of Minnesota. He served in the JAG Corps and is a member of the firm Stich, Angell, Kreidler & Dodge, P.A. Leo received his undergraduate degree and J.D. from Hamline University.

Heather Welch is a state trial court judge for the Superior Court of Marion County in Indiana.

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2016: Outreach and Inclusion with President Brown

In this Special Report, ABA President Paulette Brown sits down with William J. Oakes Boys and Girls Club Branch Manager Ricardo Sandoval and Legal Talk Network producer Laurence Colletti to discuss her Mainstreet ABA initiative. She goes into detail explaining why ABA youth outreach is so important and why she has made connecting young lawyers with the youth of America such a priority of her presidency. President Brown also takes some time to discuss the varied resources available to lawyers through the ABA Everyday program. The conversation then shifts to a discussion about the Diversity and Inclusion 360 Commission and the work they are doing on implicit bias within the judicial system.

Paulette Brown has been a lawyer for 38 years, worked for Fortune 500 companies, owned a firm for 15 years, and is now a partner at the Boston law firm Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP. She has been involved with the American Bar Association since she graduated from law school and was confirmed president-elect of the ABA in August 2014.

ABA Law Student Podcast

Resolution 109: The Fight for Bar Exam Portability

One of the most demanding endeavors that any recent law grad will face is studying for and passing the bar exam. However, upon entering the legal market, many graduates aren’t aware of the challenges associated with transferring their bar exam scores between jurisdictions. In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Fabiani Duarte and guest Christopher Jennison, the Board of Governors representative to the Law Student Division, discuss their year-long fight to provide law students with more bar exam portability by encouraging the ABA House of Delegates to adopt Resolution 109.

Christopher Jennison is the Board of Governors representative to the Law Student Division and sits on the ABA Board of Governors. He graduated from Syracuse University in 2012 with dual majors in public relations from Newhouse and policy studies from Maxwell. He also graduated with a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Pennsylvania in 2014. Christopher has been the law student liaison to the Standing Committee on Continuing Legal Education and was also the recipient of the Law Student Division’s Gold Key Award.

ABA Law Student Podcast

Shaping Your Career Path with David Lat

As the law becomes ever more complex and the legal market continues to shift and grow, entering the workforce can be incredibly intimidating to a current student or recent grad. Sifting through the options and finding the career path that is right for you can sometimes feel daunting for even the most well-prepared of students. In this installment of the ABA Law Student Podcast David Lat, founder and managing editor of Above the Law, joins hosts Fabiani Duarte and Madison Burke to discuss his path to success and provide tips that can help students shape their burgeoning careers.

David Lat is the founder and managing editor of Above the Law, a blog established in 2006 that provides news and commentary on the U.S. legal industry. Prior to this, he started Underneath Their Robes, a blog focused on the federal judiciary with pop culture magazine sensibilities. Before his career as a blogger, David attended Harvard College and Yale Law School. After school, he worked as a law clerk for Judge Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, a litigation associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York, and a federal prosecutor in Newark, New Jersey. in 2014 David published his first book, Supreme Ambitions: A Novel, to outstanding acclaim.

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