Podcast category: Law School

Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast

Trump Administration and the Law

Trump’s presidency has brought about a lot of change, especially in regard to law. In this episode of Planet Lex, host Daniel Rodriguez interviews Northwestern Law faculty members Deborah Tuerkheimer, Andrew Koppelman, and Eugene Kontorovich about recent actions by President Trump and the legal considerations facing this new administration. In their discussion, they cover a wide array of topics, including President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, his expansion of executive power, and the potential of the Department of Justice shifting away from certain civil rights issues. They conclude with a lightning round that touches on topics like climate change, affirmative action, and power the president holds and doesn’t hold over foreign treaties.

Professor Deborah Tuerkheimer joined the Northwestern Law faculty in 2014. She teaches and writes in the areas of criminal law, evidence, and feminist legal theory. She’s a former assistant district attorney and a frequent contributor to Slate.

Professor Andrew Koppelman is John Paul Stevens Professor at Northwestern Law, where he received the 2015 Walder Award for Research Excellence. His scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy.

Professor Eugene Kontorovich specializes in constitutional law, federal courts, and public international law. He has published over thirty major scholarly articles and book chapters in leading law reviews and peer-reviewed journals in the United States and Europe.

 

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2017: Lawyers: The Next Generation

So you’ve gone to law school and you know how to take tests really, really well, but did you know that being a real lawyer can involve business and tech knowledge beyond what you were tested on? In this episode of On the Road, host Laurence Colletti talks to Anna Romanskaya, chair of the ABA’s Young Lawyers Division (YLD). Together, they discuss the initiatives the YLD is taking to give young lawyers the business experience they didn’t receive in school. They also talk about what the YLD is doing to improve access to education for the generation that hasn’t yet reached law school.

Anna M. Romanskaya is a partner with Stark & D’Ambrosio, LLP and manages the firm’s family law division. She represents clients in all aspects of family law, including pre and post marital agreements, dissolution, child custody, child and spousal support, property division, and post judgment issues.

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2017: Fighting the Tide of Student Debt

If you want to be a successful lawyer, law school is a given. With the hike in student loans, however, it may be a while before you actually make any money. In this report On the Road, Sharon Nelson and Sandy Gallant-Jones interview Crystal Araujo, Jennifer Nicholls, Michael Dumas, and Whitney Barkley about rising student loans and what this means for new lawyers. A couple programs are in place to help students with their debt, like income-driven payment plans and loan repayment assistance programs, but different borrowers need different solutions. For example, recent graduates aren’t the only ones concerned about their debt. Older graduates and those who paid for their children to attend college are also experiencing this burden and potential solutions may look different for them. The group discusses this as well as the way law schools are reacting to the concerns of their students. Some schools are marketing affordability, but is this enough to encourage the attendance of potential students wary of the expense?

Jennifer Nicholls joined Brophy Schmor LLP in 2011 after graduating from the University of Oregon School of Law in 2011. Upon graduation, she was elected into the prestigious Order of the Coif chapter at Oregon.

Crystal Araujo is currently the Vice Chair of Student Bar Associations on the Law Student Division Executive Board within the American Bar Association, where she represents the collective voice of law school’s student governing bodies.

Whitney Barkley-Denney is legislative policy counsel, based in Durham, NC, where she works with state legislators, attorneys general, and governors to fight predatory lending, exploitative student loan practices, and unscrupulous debt collectors.

Michael Dumas is an assistant District Attorney at Androscoggin County District Attorney. He is a 2016 graduate of the University of Maine School of Law in Portland, Maine.

ABA Law Student Podcast

Broken Promises and Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Law school is essential to becoming a successful lawyer but it doesn’t come cheap. Public Service Loan Forgiveness was a program put in place to entice young lawyers to take public service positions which have historically paid less than private sector positions. After ten years of making on-time, full payments while in a public service role, the loan would be forgiven. Recently, though, the Department of Education was sued by the ABA for not keeping its promises. Even after declaring those involved in the program to be fully qualified for loan forgiveness, it was later decided later that they were not qualified. In this episode of the ABA Law Student Podcast, host Chris Morgan discusses these events with the president of the ABA, Linda Klein. They dive into the original goals of the program, why the program is necessary, and actions the ABA is currently taking to ensure those relying on the program are compensated. Linda concludes by saying that the Department of Education’s decision will also affect the ability of the ABA to provide legal services to those that need it most.

Linda Klein is the senior managing shareholder at Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz and president of the American Bar Association. Klein’s practice, based in Atlanta, includes most types of business dispute resolution, including contract law, employment law and professional liability, working extensively with clients in the construction, higher education and pharmaceutical industries.

ABA Journal: Asked and Answered

How to prepare for another try at the bar exam

It’s not terribly unusual for a law grad to need to take the bar exam more than once to pass. But the experience of failing the bar can be crushing to one’s confidence–and concentration. After failing the bar exam, many students have a hard time studying for a retake. This is not necessarily because they can’t do the work, but because anxiety and fear of failure get in the way, Jamie Kleppetsch of John Marshall Law School tells the ABA Journal’s Stephanie Francis Ward in this month’s Asked and Answered.

Kleppetsch, who is president of the Association of Academic Support Educators as well as being an associate director of John Marshall’s Academic Achievement Program, shares with listeners some tips for reapproaching the bar exam with a fresh mindset and more preparation.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney.

Legal Toolkit

Better Preparing Lawyers for the Practice of Law

Many young lawyers entering the legal marketplace are surprised to find that they are lacking the fundamental skills necessary to successfully practice law and stay competitive while seeking employment. In this episode of The Legal Toolkit, host Jared Correia talks with American Bar Association Commission on Hispanic Rights & Responsibilities Commissioner Fred Rooney, Suffolk University Law School Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Ilene Seidman, Michigan State University College of Law Professor of Law in Residence Daniel Linna, and Stanford Law School fellow Margaret Hagan about their respective programs and the additional skills that law schools should teach students to better prepare them for the practice of law.

Special thanks to our sponsors Amicus Attorney and Scorpion.

Law Technology Now

Closing the Gap Between Law School and the Legal Industry

When first entering the legal profession, young lawyers can sometimes feel ill prepared for the everyday rigors of working at a law firm and practicing the law. In this episode of Law Technology Now, host Monica Bay talks with Professor Daniel Martin Katz about the industry’s need for law school curriculums to better reflect the demands of the legal marketplace and his efforts to change the profession by creating a different type of lawyer.

Professor Katz is a scientist, technologist, and law professor who applies an innovative polytechnic approach to teaching law to help create lawyers for today’s challenging legal job market. Both his scholarship and teaching integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

On the Road

State Bar of Michigan Annual Meeting: State Bar of Michigan Young Lawyers Section

After graduating from law school it can be hard for young lawyers to connect with other industry professionals within their community. In this report from On The Road, hosts JoAnn Hathaway and Tish Vincent talk with incoming chair of the State Bar of Michigan Young Lawyers Section Shenique Moss about upcoming events available to Michigan’s young lawyers and her experiences with the Young Lawyers Section.

Shenique Moss is Assistant Attorney General to the Michigan Department of Attorney General and incoming chair of the State Bar of Michigan Young Lawyers Section.

Planet Lex: The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Podcast

The Regulation of Public Corruption

In this episode of Planet Lex, host Daniel Rodriguez speaks with Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Harry R. Horrow Professor in International Law Juliet Sorensen about the pervasiveness and regulation of corruption. Juliet defines public corruption as the abuse of public office for private gain and discusses the challenges of working within the various parameters of both civil causes of action and criminal law to regulate said corruption. Certain forms of malfeasance, like bribery, have been traditionally governed by criminal law while other forms like patronage and nepotism have been grounds for civil actions under the First Amendment but have generally been found not to be either federal, state, or local crimes. Juliet highlights that in a functioning democracy the safeguard against public officials who the electorate disapproves of is voting them out of office. However, if corruption has pervaded a democracy to the extent that voting public officials out of office cannot be done in a free and fair way, then that is an impingement of human rights. She shares that many countries are unable or unwilling to regulate public corruption for a myriad of reasons, including limited resources and weak institutions, and that in some countries the culture of corruption is so pervasive that it becomes incredibly difficult to change. Juliet also analyzes the International Olympic Committee’s decision not to ban Russia from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and discusses how the McLaren Investigation Report on doping in Russia illustrates abuses of all levels of public office but not necessarily for monetary gain. She closes the interview with an investigation of how the emergency reconstruction phase after major extreme weather events can facilitate corruption and how we can combat this. Finally, she considers the severity of public corruption, domestically or internationally, against other major issues of social policy or criminal law enforcement.

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