Podcast category: Best Legal Practices

Special Reports

ABA Law Practice Division: Micah Buchdahl on the Law Practice Today Webzine

The Digital Edge host Jim Calloway interviews Law Practice Today Editor-in-Chief  Micah Buchdahl about the Webzine at the 2014 American Bar Association Law Practice Division Fall Meeting. Buchdahl gives some examples of high quality content topics the webzine provides, how they are doing Local and State Bar outreach, and explains how previously unpublished lawyers can be involved in writing content for Law Practice Today. Previously a sports and entertainment lawyer, Micah Buchdahl now works with law firms on marketing and business development strategies.

 

Special Reports

ABA Law Practice Division: Chad Burton and Adriana Linares on E-Lawyering

Legal Talk Network Producer Laurence Colletti interviews E-Lawyering Task Force Co-Chair Chad Burton and Vice-Chair Adriana Linares at the 2014 American Bar Association Law Practice Division Fall Meeting. Together, they discuss core components to delivering legal services using technology, helping clients be more comfortable using portals to exchange information, and the future of the E-Lawyering Task Force in 2015. Chad Burton and Adriana Linares are both in the forefront of facilitating the use of technology for lawyers and legal professionals.

 

Special Reports

ABA Law Practice Division: Leona Frank on the Women Rainmakers Group

Legal Talk Network Producer Laurence Colletti interviews Vice Chair of the Women Rainmakers Board Leona Frank at the 2014 ABA Law Practice Division Fall Meeting. She discusses the history of the Women Rainmakers Board, the focus on newer female attorneys heading towards leadership roles, and how women should mold the legal profession around themselves, not fit in. She also explains how the group address the underrepresentation of female leadership within legal professions through networking, mentoring, and local programming. Leona Frank is a solo practitioner, a strategist for professional athletes, and has been Secretary of the ABA Law Practice Division, among many other impressive titles.

New Solo

Setting Legal Fees in Your Law Practice

When starting your solo practice, figuring out how to price your services can be very difficult. Many new lawyers undercut the market or undervalue what they have to offer. Additionally, in this emerging market of flat fees, they have to consider their strategy for setting legal rates. When charging for hourly legal services, what should be the lowest starting rate? How should a solo lawyer structure a system for flat fee pricing? What are the signs of undercharging and how should attorneys convey the value of their services to the client?

On this episode of New Solo, Adriana Linares interviews attorney Ted Waggoner about how lawyers should set their fees, hourly versus flat fee pricing, and educating clients about the true value of their legal services. When starting a new practice, Waggoner explains, lawyers should set their fees based on expenses, investment, the client’s budget, and, of course, profit. Each attorney will adjust these fees based on mistakes and experience. However, Waggoner also encourages lawyers to think like business people; have a discussion with the client about how valuable the legal services are and set fees accordingly. Lawyers need to establish a relationship with their clients in order to manage their expectations, educate them about value and benefits, and scope out the case. Waggoner also emphasizes the importance of research through blogs or consultants such as David Maister, Alan Weiss, and Ron Baker. In the end, he says, the fees are set to what the client wants to pay and is willing to pay, and whether the lawyer accepts that amount.

Ted A. Waggoner is the managing partner at Peterson Waggoner & Perkins, LLP in Rochester, Indiana. Waggoner has been an active presenter for lawyers Continuing Legal Education seminars, having lectured at the Solo and Small Firm Conference on topics such as Fundamentals of Successful Solo and Small Firm Practice; Tough Moments with Clients; and Selling Your Client’s Business. Waggoner has also contributed to articles in the ABA Journal and other ABA publications.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Solo Practice University.

 

 

ABA Journal: Asked and Answered

How to Network Without Feeling Slimy

Lawyers are often told how important professional networking is. But many find it so uncomfortable they feel physically dirty. Why is professional networking so distressing to so many? And how can you overcome it and be successful?

In this month’s Asked and Answered podcast, we speak to Tiziana Casciaro, one of the authors of a recent study, “The Contaminating Effects of Building Instrumental Ties: How Networking Can Make Us Feel Dirty,” published in Administrative Science Quarterly. She shares with moderator Stephanie Francis Ward some tips for getting past this mental block, and how to feel better about reaching out to potential clients and colleagues.

Tiziana Casciaro is an associate professor of organizational behavior at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management. Her work focuses on the social-psychological mechanisms responsible for the formation and growth of social networks within and between organizations. She’s also a co-author of a recent Administrative Science Quarterly article, “The Contaminating Effects of Building Instrumental Ties: How Networking Can Make Us Feel Dirty.”

 

 

Ringler Radio

Structured Settlements: Third Party Administrator Management

 

In this podcast, Ringler Radio host Larry Cohen and co-host, Duke Wolpert join Charles F. Martin from Marsh Risk Consulting, a global leader in insurance broking and risk management, to discuss third party administrator (TPA) management and the importance of a solid relationship between risk managers and TPA’s for insurance claims and structured settlements.

Visit Ringler Associates to contact a consultant in your area about structured settlements.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer

Anniversary Show: Welcoming Our Tenth Year

Having started their tenth year in podcasting, Lawyer 2 Lawyer hosts Bob Ambrogi and J. Craig Williams take time to reflect upon on past shows, guests, and favorite moments. In an exchange of roles, Bob and Craig are interviewed by their very first guest, Michael S. Greco from K&L Gates LLP, who was the President of the American Bar Association and originally joined the show to talk about his initiatives. Tune in to hear about how our hosts got started in law, who wins “Name That Guest”, favorite shows of 2014, as well as bloopers and theme songs. Thank you to all of our listeners over the years. We hope you enjoy this episode.

Michael S. Greco is currently Of-counsel at K&L Gates LLP an international law firm that’s 2,000 attorneys strong and represents large business interests. He is a commercial litigator, arbitrator, mediator, and appellate lawyer with more than 40 years of experience in resolving complex business issues and other disputes throughout the United States and internationally. In addition, Mr. Greco is a former President of the American Bar Association.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Clio.

 

Digital Detectives

Predictive Coding for Rookies: E-Discovery in the Courtroom

Discovery, as all lawyers know, is the process of collecting and exchanging information about the court case to prepare for the trial. Traditionally, this was done by many lawyers over countless billable hours in which every page of potential evidence was examined for important information. Because of this, the more information existed in reference to a case, the more expensive the case was. As technology developed, law firms began using computers to do keyword searches and conceptual searches. Unfortunately, there were problems including picking the right keywords or concepts, misspelled words, how to structure the items, and that these searches only yielded 20% of important data. Recently, technology has advanced to predictive coding, or teaching a computer program to think like a lawyer would. But how cost effective and practical is predictive coding, and how well does it actually work?

In this episode of The Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the evolution of technology and case discovery, how predictive coding works and is priced, and examples of cases that have involved predictive coding. Simek first explains the importance of culling, or filtering out unimportant data sets through DeNISTing, deduping, or filtering by dates. He then explains predictive coding in its simplicity: to feed a computer program information based on discovery attorneys have already done until the computer can accurately predict which information is important. Simek and Nelson then go on to examine the prices vendors charge for the predictive coding process and in which cases it might be profitable for the law firm or client. There is a steep, expensive learning curve involved; many mid-sized law firms probably will not profit and even very large cases only save an average of 15% using predictive coding. However, Nelson explains, predictive coding is the future of discovery, so it is important for lawyers to pay attention to when the benefits outweigh the costs.

Nelson concludes the podcast by giving examples of when predictive coding has already appeared in court cases. The landmark case was Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, in which Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck allowed predictive coding to be used as long as the defense and prosecution agree to its use, there are a large volume of documents, it is the superior technology, it is more cost effective, and it is transparent and defensible. Inevitably, the conclusion is that it is not for the judge to micromanage the discovery process.

Special thanks to our sponsor, Digital WarRoom.

Gone Clio

Clio Cloud Conference: Bob Ambrogi Interviews Jack Newton, CEO of Clio

Lawyer 2 Lawyer host Bob Ambrogi interviews Clio CEO Jack Newton at the Clio Cloud Conference in Chicago. They discuss the history of Clio as a company and the purpose of the Clio Cloud Conference, the attitude of lawyers towards practice management and cloud computing, and why there is such a low adoption rate. Newton explains current and future Clio features including integrations, mobile management apps, and the roll out of ClioNext, the newest iteration of the application. Jack Newton, co founder and CEO of Clio, launched the Clio Cloud Conference to bring legal professionals together to discuss thought leadership, the future of legal as a business, and where legal technology is going.

 

 

Special Reports

Clio Cloud Conference: Omar Ha-Redeye on Social Media Affecting Legal Cases

New Solo host Adriana Linares interviews Omar Ha-Redeye about his experience at the 2014 Clio Cloud Conference. Ha-Redeye discusses being a Canadian lawyer, how social media can negatively affect legal cases through false evidence or jury tampering, and how he uses Clio differently within his company. Omar Ha-Redeye founded Fleet Street Law, an incubator that provides strategic support mentoring for young lawyers who want to build up their skill sets.

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