Podcast category: Access to Justice

Lawyerist Podcast

#53: Putting Access to Justice into Practice, with Billie Tarascio

 

“I’m an accidental software developer.”

Billie Tarascio started out trying to build a firm that furthers access to justice, and wound up building a pretty innovative law firm with a software backbone that allowed her to deliver legal services at every price point—and it didn’t work. You’ll find out why in today’s podcast, but first, don’t forget that clients and customers are looking for very different things.

Billie Tarascio has two companies:

  1. Access Legal, a legal document assembly platform sort of like LegalZoom for Arizona divorces.
  2. Modern Law, an Arizona family law firm that relies on the same software (and forms) that power Access Legal.

The thing is, Access Legal is at once really innovative and exciting and almost exactly what everyone says small firms need to be doing, and it didn’t work. Tarascio tried to eat her own lunch, and it just didn’t work.

Listen now to find out why. There may be some important lessons to take away from this.

Lawyerist Podcast

#39: Tips for Representing Low-Income Clients, with Martha Delaney

 

Representing low-income clients can present challenges for lawyers who are not used to it, but learning to meet those challenges is a good lesson in basic client service. While we’re on the subject, what is the access-to-justice gap everyone is talking about, and can you really build a profitable law practice serving people who fall into that gap?

It’s not that representing low-income clients is hard; it’s just that low-income clients magnify problems you may not realize you have when representing other clients. On today’s podcast, Martha Delaney explains common misconceptions many lawyers have about representing low-income clients, identifies barriers to representing clients, talks about good client service.

If you represent clients, you’ll get something from this podcast — whether or not they are low-income.

Lawyerist Podcast

#27: Omar Ha-Redeye on Incubating the Future of Access to Justice

 

“Never do any work unless you’ve been paid for it.”

Omar Ha-Redeye is (among other impressive things) co-founder of Fleet Street Law, a law practice incubator focusing on innovation and increasing access to justice. In today’s podcast, he talks about how the legal industry is changing and what that means for the future of access to justice. But first, we try to figure out why lawyers let receivables become a problem.

The future of access to justice depends, in part, on experienced lawyers being willing to teach inexperienced lawyers how to run a law practice and serve clients, but also on innovation. Ha-Redeye’s Fleet Street Law incubator does all of that, and is helping to increase access to justice in Canada.

If you enjoy thinking about innovative law practice models, the future of law practice, and access to justice, you won’t want to miss Sam’s conversation with Omar Ha-Redeye.

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