Podcast category: Access to Justice

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2017: The Decline of American Jury Trials

Alan Dimond, chair of the American Bar Association’s Commission on the American Jury, joins Laurence Colletti in this report from On The Road to discuss the commission and why the number of trials in the U.S. seems to have fallen so dramatically. According to their preliminary report, there are financial, sentencing, and other contributing reasons for fewer trials in the states, and the commission is investigating whether this is something that the ABA can and/or should try to change.

Alan Dimond is a lawyer at the law firm of Greenberg Traurig LLP. Prior to that he was a trial lawyer for the local county government in Miami-Dade, FL.

On the Road

ABA Midyear Meeting 2017: Civil Justice for All

A committee was established by the Conference of Chief Justices with the goal of finding ways to improve the cost and efficiency of the civil justice system. In this report from On the Road, host Laurence Colletti interviews members of that committee including Judge Bailey, Dean Lieberman, Chief Justice Balmer, and Chief Justice Jefferson. Together, they discuss their report which details 13 ways state court systems can improve civil cases. These recommendations range from curbing excessive discovery to simply using time effectively.

Judge Jennifer D. Bailey has been a circuit court judge in Miami-Dade, Florida, for twenty-four years. She is the Administrative Judge for the 25-judge Circuit Civil Division, and handles a docket of complex business litigation cases.

Hannah Lieberman joined the David A. Clarke School of Law as associate dean of Experiential and Clinical Programs in September, 2016, bringing to the position broad experience as a leader and litigator in the public interest sector. In her new position, Ms. Lieberman will lead the clinical faculty team to further develop the Law School’s exemplary clinical and experiential programs.

Thomas A. Balmer was elected by his colleagues as Oregon’s 43rd Chief Justice and began service on May 1, 2012.  He was first appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor John Kitzhaber in 2001; he was elected in 2002 and re-elected in 2008 and 2014.

Wallace Bernard Jefferson is the former chief justice of the Supreme Court of Texas, who served from 2004 until October 1, 2013. In October 2013, he joined the law firm of Alexander Dubose Jefferson Townsend LLP, as a name partner.

Lawyerist Podcast

#92: Access to Justice Through Fotonovelas and Video Games, with Susan Garcia Nofi

 

I think being a lawyer, I was very focused on that we have to help people when they get in a courtroom, but there’s a lot that happens before you get to the courtroom.—Susan Garcia Nofi

On this week’s podcast, Sam and Aaron talk about just how to actually measure the access to justice gap. Then, Sam talks with Susan Garcia Nofi about using fotonovelas and video games to increase access to justice.

Susan Garcia Nofi is the executive director of the New Haven Legal Assistance Association. Susan speaks Spanish and is a member of the bar in the State of Connecticut and the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut. Susan serves on the Boards of Directors of the Community Fund for Women and Girls, and the New Haven County Bar Association. Susan is also a member of the Connecticut Judicial Branch Access to Justice Commission, the Connecticut Judicial Branch Pro Bono Committee, the Connecticut Bar Association, and the Connecticut Hispanic Bar Association.

On the Road

State Bar of Michigan Annual Meeting: The Michigan Legal Help Program

When it comes to civil legal matters, sometimes an individual may have to represent themselves in the court of law. In this report from On The Road, host Laurence Colletti talks with Michigan Legal Help Program Project Manager Angela Tripp, State Bar of Michigan Practice Management Advisor JoAnn Hathaway, and Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program Administrator Tish Vincent about the Michigan Legal Help Program and how they are working to increase access to justice and fill the legal gap.

Angela Tripp has been the project manager of the Michigan Legal Help Program since 2011, and co-managing attorney of the Michigan Poverty Law Program since 2010. She transitioned into these roles after working with Legal Services of South Central Michigan since 2005, first as a staff attorney and then as a managing attorney in the Lansing field office.

Lawyerist Podcast

#54: Open Access to Law, with Sarah Glassmeyer & Ed Walters

 

“In its own raw native state, there’s not a whole lot [the law] can do to promote access to justice.”

Sarah Glassmeyer is trying to get to the bottom of open access to law, and Ed Walters is trying to build a company based on access to that law. Both share their frustrations and wishes for open access on today’s podcast. Plus, lawyers are terrible at client intake. News at 11.

If ignorance of the law is no excuse (and we all know it isn’t), it stands to reason that everyone should be able to go find out what the law is. And in 2016, that means putting the law online in a usable format.

Sarah Glassmeyer has been spending a year trying to figure out what primary law is available online, and you can check out the results on her website. On today’s podcast, she talks about the state of open access to law, including the important distinction between content and containers.

Ed Walters is the CEO of Fastcase. On today’s podcast, he talks about how closed-off primary law stifles innovation. (It takes 80% of Fastcase’s employees to keep the database updated.) And just days after we recorded, Fastcase sued Casemaker for access to Georgia law.

We also talk about the important differences between access to law, access to lawyers, and access to justice.

Lawyerist Podcast

#53: Putting Access to Justice into Practice, with Billie Tarascio

 

“I’m an accidental software developer.”

Billie Tarascio started out trying to build a firm that furthers access to justice, and wound up building a pretty innovative law firm with a software backbone that allowed her to deliver legal services at every price point—and it didn’t work. You’ll find out why in today’s podcast, but first, don’t forget that clients and customers are looking for very different things.

Billie Tarascio has two companies:

  1. Access Legal, a legal document assembly platform sort of like LegalZoom for Arizona divorces.
  2. Modern Law, an Arizona family law firm that relies on the same software (and forms) that power Access Legal.

The thing is, Access Legal is at once really innovative and exciting and almost exactly what everyone says small firms need to be doing, and it didn’t work. Tarascio tried to eat her own lunch, and it just didn’t work.

Listen now to find out why. There may be some important lessons to take away from this.

Lawyerist Podcast

#39: Tips for Representing Low-Income Clients, with Martha Delaney

 

Representing low-income clients can present challenges for lawyers who are not used to it, but learning to meet those challenges is a good lesson in basic client service. While we’re on the subject, what is the access-to-justice gap everyone is talking about, and can you really build a profitable law practice serving people who fall into that gap?

It’s not that representing low-income clients is hard; it’s just that low-income clients magnify problems you may not realize you have when representing other clients. On today’s podcast, Martha Delaney explains common misconceptions many lawyers have about representing low-income clients, identifies barriers to representing clients, talks about good client service.

If you represent clients, you’ll get something from this podcast — whether or not they are low-income.

Lawyerist Podcast

#27: Omar Ha-Redeye on Incubating the Future of Access to Justice

 

“Never do any work unless you’ve been paid for it.”

Omar Ha-Redeye is (among other impressive things) co-founder of Fleet Street Law, a law practice incubator focusing on innovation and increasing access to justice. In today’s podcast, he talks about how the legal industry is changing and what that means for the future of access to justice. But first, we try to figure out why lawyers let receivables become a problem.

The future of access to justice depends, in part, on experienced lawyers being willing to teach inexperienced lawyers how to run a law practice and serve clients, but also on innovation. Ha-Redeye’s Fleet Street Law incubator does all of that, and is helping to increase access to justice in Canada.

If you enjoy thinking about innovative law practice models, the future of law practice, and access to justice, you won’t want to miss Sam’s conversation with Omar Ha-Redeye.