You Don’t Have to Be a Lawyer to Love Legal Talk Network’s New Show, Planet Lex

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by Kelsey Johnson

Woman Listening to Podcasts

Let’s face it. Legal Talk Network makes podcasts for lawyers. We’re not ashamed of it. And as a legal nerd and podcast nerd, I love them, but when I’m recommending episodes to my non-lawyer friends, sometimes I run short. That’s why I’m so excited for our new podcast Planet Lex. For a podcast made by a law school (Northwestern Pritzker School of Law) with the dean as host, Planet Lex is surprisingly accessible and compelling to lawyers and non-lawyers alike.

The first episode is an interview with Steven Drizin and Laura Nirider, the post-conviction attorneys for Brendan Dassey, one of the subjects from the documentary Making a Murderer. Drizin and Nirider are central parts to the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth, having spent years working to overturn wrongful convictions and ensure evidence is reliable. They discuss the Brendan Dassey and other cases with host Dan Rodriguez, describing the events that happened and why, from a legal standpoint, his confession might be unreliable as evidence. For any Making a Murderer fans jonesing for more information, you will learn a lot about the appeals process from the lawyers who are directly involved. Listen to Defending Brendan Dassey of “Making a Murderer”.

Episode 2 features music copyright. Wait, stay with me. The evolution of how musicians make money, and why it has become increasingly important due to technological advancements, is not only important, it’s interesting. Whether you are thinking of pursuing your own musical career (after listening to the podcast, I recommend against it) or are simply curious about how artists make (or don’t make) money from your Spotify list, guest Peter DiCola offers in-depth and accessible answers to both. Listen to The Evolution of Copyright in Music.

On the third episode of Planet Lex, Dan Rodriguez talks with Emerson Tiller and Leslie Oster about the new Master of Science in Law Program at Northwestern, a program meant for STEM professionals. STEM stands for people studying or working in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or, in other words, people who traditionally think very differently than lawyers. But, as Tiller and Oster explain, when legal skills are combined with STEM backgrounds, it results in valuable business skills. Don’t know about you, but now I’m interested. Listen to Integrating the Law and STEM Focused Multidisciplinary Education.

If you’ve been thinking about trying out a new legal podcast or are looking for a recommendation for your non-lawyer friends or partners, Planet Lex might be just the podcast for you. I know I’ll be listening. Let us know what you think on Twitter or Facebook!